Category: Gluten-Free

Grilled Ribeye Steaks (boneless)

Grilled Ribeye Steaks (boneless)

Ribeye steaks are tender and tasty. Salt and pepper are all that’s needed to properly season with a brush of oil to prevent sticking. Not too much or the flames flare up.

Heat the grill about 15 minutes before cooking. You want a hot grill. Keep the lid open if the steaks are thin (about 1-inch thick or less). They cook too fast with the lid closed and don’t get the nice sear marks that provide so much flavor.

Toss a couple of steaks on the grill and while they’re resting, grill some corn.

Watch the Grilled Ribeye Steak Video Here.

 

Grilled Pork Chops

Grilled Double-Thick Pork Chops

Double-thick pork chops marinated in fig vinegar, olive oil, dried sage, salt and pepper. Pop them on the grill and cook until slightly pink in the center and mouthwateringly moist and tender.  And, we have some suggestions of what to serve on the side!

Potato packets – no pots and pans!

Vinegar Coleslaw for a tangy side!

Grilled Vegetables for no mess no fuss clean up!

Four Bean Salad, which can be made a day in advance!

These pork chops are thick and need both direct and indirect heat. Turn on the grill about 15 minutes before cooking. Start over the direct heat to sear and color the chops on both sides, then move to the indirect heat an dturn the direct heat to low. The ideal grill temperature is 300 degrees F.

Cook until the internal temperature is 140 degrees F; let rest for 5 minutes. Serve whole or sliced. These pork chops are slightly pink inside and very juicy!

Watch the Grilled Pork Chop Video Here.

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Grilled Pork Chops

fig and sage marinated double-thick center-cut grilled pork chop

Double-thick pork chops marinated in fig vinegar, olive oil, dried sage, salt and pepper. Pop them on the grill and cook until slightly pink in the center and mouthwateringly moist and tender.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x
  • Category: Meat/Pork
  • Method: Grilling
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Ingredients

1/4 cup fig vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon dried sage, rub together in your palm to crumble
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
2 double-thick center-cut pork chops

Instructions

These pork chops are thick and need both direct and indirect heat.

Turn on the grill about 15 minutes before cooking and then turn off one side of the grill. If using charcoal, divide the grill in half and light the one side.

Start cooking over the direct heat to sear and color the chops on both sides. 2 minutes per side.

Slide the chops over to the indirect heat and continue cooking;  the ideal grill temperature is 300 degrees F.

Cook until the internal temperature is 140 degrees F, turning the chops every 2 minutes Llet rest for 5 minutes. These pork chops are slightly pink inside and very juicy!

Serve whole or sliced.

Keywords: grilled pork chops, center-cut pork chops, pork, fig vinegar, sage, barbecuing, grilling, dairy-free, gluten-free, nut-free, father’s day recipe, father’s day bone-in center-cut pork chops

Grilled Butterflied Leg of Lamb

Grilled Butterflied Leg of Lamb

Make a grilled butterflied leg of lamb as the perfect  summer get-to-together meal! Use any rub or marinade to flavor and let sit at least four hours or overnight. I checked my pantry to look for marinades that got pushed to the back and were forgotten. I found a Stonewall Kitchen pineapple ginger sauce that was perfect. It’s always nice to have some on hand – we don’t always feel like making everything from scratch!

If the lamb is large and unwieldy, use the natural lines of the meat to help you cut it into parts. Each piece has a different thickness and needs different cooking times. Separating the leg also has the advantage of cooking pieces to different internal temperatures. Satisfy your family and guests with slices that are medium rare, medium and well done.

Start with direct heat to sear the outside. Once you have a nicely browned and crispy outside, move to the indirect heat. Close the cover and continue cooking at about 300 degrees F. Optimal internal temperature is 135 degrees F for medium rare.

Serve this delicious lamb with our summer vegetable medley. A combination of eggplant, zucchini, baby bell peppers and cherry tomatoes. A little shredded cheese, such as mozzarella or feta complete the dish.

Watch the Butterflied Leg of Lamb Video Here.

Grilled Chicken Breast (bone in)

Grilled Bone-in Chicken Breast

We have filmed a number of grilling videos including several on chicken.This video on grilled bone-in chicken breast is one of five videos in our grilling chicken playlist. Watch here.

Any time you cook meat or poultry with the bone in and skin on, it takes a little longer. The benefit of cooking this way is a more succulent and juicier chicken . If you have the time, it’s definitely a worth it.

Seasoning can be minimal, simply salt and pepper with a drizzle of oil to prevent sticking. Not to much or flames flare up. Use a marinade, homemade or store bought, or a rub. Let sit for at least 30 minutes or overnight.

Preheat the grill about 15 minutes before cooking. Use direct heat first to sear the skin, then move to indirect heat to slowly finish.

Serve with a delicious macaroni salad and eat out on the picnic table or the porch!

Watch the Grilled Chicken Breast Video Here:

 

 

Cobb Salad

Composed Salad

Cobb salad is delicious for an afternoon luncheon or for a warm weather dinner.

Watch the Cobb Salad Video Here.

Check out our How To Sauté Chicken Breasts  and the “Finger Test” videos.

A Cobb salad is a composed salad. The ingredients are presented in rows, rather than tossed, for an eye-appealing presentation. Pour dressing over everything and serve!

Composed Salad

The presentation creates a lovely balance of color, texture and flavors.

Composed Salad

The salad originated at the Brown Derby in LA, supposedly put together late in the evening at the end of service using what was left in the kitchen.

Composed Salad

This is a quick and easy meal to make ahead; dress at the last minute for a light and refreshing lunch or dinner.

 

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Cobb Salad

Cobb salad is a composed salad, which simply means the ingredients are not tossed together but laid out in a colorful and eye appealing way. Quick and easy recipe for lunch or dinner

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 1 hour
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6 servings 1x
  • Category: One-Dish Meal/Salad
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Ingredients

Vinaigrette

½ cup extra-virgin olive oil

¼ cup red wine vinegar

¼ cup chopped chives

1 teaspoon Dijon Mustard

¼ teaspoon coarse salt

½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

Salad

6 cups chopped lettuce (Romaine, Bibb, watercress)

20 cherry tomatoes, halved

4 slices cooked and coarsely chopped bacon

1 pound cooked whole boneless, skinless chicken breast

2 hard boiled eggs, quartered lengthwise

2 Hass avocado, peeled and sliced crosswise

4 ounces blue cheese crumbles

Instructions

Vinaigrette

Combine the oil, vinegar, chives, mustard, salt and pepper in a jar. Close tightly and shake well.

Salad

Strew the lettuce across the bottom of a large platter.

Arrange each ingredient in a row.

Pour dressing over everything and serve.

 

How To Sauté Chicken Breasts

finger test

Skinless boneless chicken breasts are so versatile. Here’s a simple way to sauté chicken breasts with only salt, pepper and a little olive oil. Pouring a vinaigrette or a little fresh citrus juice over the chicken as soon as it comes off the heat to rest quickly and easily infuses flavors into the chicken.

Make sure you pound the chicken breasts to even out the thickness and they’ll cook evenly. If you have time, let the chicken sit on the counter for 30 or 40 minutes to warm up a bit.

finger test

Check out the “Finger Test” video  to test for doneness when you don’t have a thermometer handy.

Watch the How To Sauté Chicken Breasts Here

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How To Sauté Chicken Breasts

sauteed chicken breast

Skinless boneless chicken breasts are so versatile. Here’s a simple way to sauté chicken breasts with only salt, pepper and a little olive oil. Pouring a vinaigrette or a little fresh citrus juice over the chicken as soon as it comes off the heat to rest quickly and easily infuses flavors into the chicken.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 10 mins
  • Cook Time: 10 mins
  • Total Time: 20 mins
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x
  • Category: Chicken
  • Method: Saute
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Ingredients

  • 1 whole skinless, boneless chicken breast, split
  • coarse salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions

  1. Pound each breast to even thickness for even cooking with a meat pounder or heavy-bottomed pan. Be sure to cover the chicken with film first to prevent splattering.
  2. Season each breast, both sides, with salt and pepper.
  3. Heat the oil over high heat in a skillet large enough to hold all the chicken, or cook in batches.
  4. Lay the chicken breasts in the pan and cook for 3 minutes.
  5. Turn and cook for 2 minutes.*
  6. Be sure to rest the chicken; then slice on the bias or serve whole.

Notes

Timing will varie depending on the thickness and temperature of the chicken.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 4

 

 

Wilted Spinach Salad with Warm Bacon Vinaigrette

Wilted Spinach Salad with Warm Bacon Vinaigrette

A wilted salad is typically an unappealing one, with old, brown leaves. An intentionally wilted spinach salad, however, gently “cooks” the leaves with a warm vinaigrette and is delightful to the eye and palette.

I prefer baby spinach in general, because it requires less work. The stems are delicate, edible and usually less sandy than their mature counterpart. Mature spinach needs a thorough wash and rinse and the tough stems have to be removed. A tedious job.

Wilted Spinach Salad with Warm Bacon Vinaigrette

The best way to cook bacon is in a cold pan to prevent sticking and promote even browning. Place the bacon in the pan and cook over medium-high heat, stirring frequently.

The bacon, scallions and vinegar release aromas that are smoky, savory and tangy all at once. For added texture, don’t hesitate to add toasted or seasoned nuts for an added crunch.

Watch the Wilted Spinach Salad with Warm Bacon Vinaigrette Video Here

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Wilted Spinach Salad with Warm Bacon Vinaigrette

Wilted Spinach Salad with Warm Bacon Vinaigrette

A wilted spinach salad gently “cooks” the leaves with a warm vinaigrette and is delightful to the eye and palette.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 4 portions 1x
  • Category: Salads
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Ingredients

Bacon Vinaigrette

2 slices bacon, diced
4 sliced scallions, green tops included
23 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons champagne vinegar
a pinch of coarse salt

a few cranks on the pepper mill

Spinach Salad

6 cups baby spinach
2 cups, about 6 ounces, button mushrooms, washed, woody stems removed and thinly sliced
½ cup thinly sliced red onions, rinsed and dried
16 cherry tomatoes, halved
¼ cup blue cheese crumbles

Instructions

Bacon Vinaigrette

Place the bacon in a cold pan over medium-high heat and cook until crisp, stirring occasionally.

Stir in the scallion and cook until wilted, about 2 minutes.

Add the olive oil, vinegar, salt and pepper and whisk.

Spinach Salad

Place the spinach, mushrooms, onions and tomatoes in a salad bowl.

Whisk the hot dressing one more time and pour over the salad.

Toss and top with the blue cheese.

Notes

Use as much olive to the bacon fat to make 1/4 cup.

The best way to cook bacon is in a cold pan to prevent sticking and browns evenly. Place the bacon in the pan and cook over medium-high heat, stirring frequently.

Keywords: warm salad, spinach salad, spinach, bacon, mushrooms, spinach and bacon salad, dairy-free, gluten-free, bacon vinaigrette, warm vinaigrette, salad dressing, warm salad dressing

 

Braised Country-Style Spareribs with Red Cabbage and Apples

Country-Style Spareribs

Country-style spare ribs are moist and tender when braised low and slow and taste delicious accompanied with red cabbage and apples.

When I was a kid, we had spareribs and sauerkraut a few times a year in fall and winter. I was never a fan of the regular spareribs. Too greasy and not enough meat. Somehow, those spareribs taste better when cooked low and slow on the barbecue with a tangy red sauce.

My mom mixed up the type of meat she used throughout the season and I was happiest when she chose country-style spareribs. These are thick and meaty and when cooked properly, fall-apart tender.

Country-style ribs are more pork chop than ribs. This cut, which  is very meaty and less fatty than spareribs, is from the front end of the baby back ribs and are an economical cut. Cook low and slow, known as braising, which melds the delicious flavors of the meat and vegetables. Braises are best made the day before; defat the top before reheating.

Tip: I rarely brown my meat before braising anymore. I really can’t tell the difference with low and slow cooking. Lots of flavors are released during cooking that more than compensate for not browning.

Country-Style Spareribs

For this recipe I chose to use fresh red cabbage and Granny Smith apples with thinly sliced, caramelized onions, stock and apple cider. Caraway seeds and juniper berries (use a disposable tea filter bag for easy removal) nicely complement the pork and the vegetables. Five minutes before serving, add the vinegar and dill, stir and serve!

Country-Style Spareribs

Watch the Country-Style Spareribs with Red Cabbage and Apples Here.

 

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Braised Country-Style Spareribs with Red Cabbage and Apples

Country-Style Spareribs

Cook this either in a slow cooker or on the stovetop. If you have the time, cool and refrigerate overnight to allow the flavors to meld.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 25 minutes
  • Cook Time: 8 hours
  • Total Time: 8 hours 25 minutes
  • Yield: 6 servings 1x
  • Category: Pork
  • Method: Slow Cooking
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Ingredients

  • 2 ½ pounds country-style spareribs
  • 2 teaspoons Kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cups thinly sliced onions
  • 1 red cabbage, shredded
  • 2 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored and thinly sliced lengthwise
  • 3 cloves garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 2 juniper berries
  • 1 cups stock or water
  • ½ cup apple cider
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar or lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh dill

Instructions

  1. Generously season the ribs with salt and pepper.
  2. Heat the oil over medium heat in a heat-tolerant slow-cooker insert or large Dutch oven. Add the onion to the hot pan and sweat for 5 minutes, Continue cooking until lightly caramelized, about 10 minutes more. Watch the heat, don’t burn the onions, add a little water as needed to deglaze the pan or loosen the caramelized onion juices from the bottom of the pan. This is what colors and flavors the onion.
  3. Stir in the cabbage, apples, garlic, caraway seeds and juniper berries, stock and apple cider. Tuck the ribs into the vegetables and bring to a boil.
  4. Slow Cooker: Remove the insert to the slow cooker, cover and set on low for 6-8 hours, the timing will depend on the amount of heat your slow cooker generates, until fork tender. Turn the pork half way through cooking.
  5. Stovetop: Reduce the heat to low (barely a simmer), cover and cook for 2-3 hours, until fork tender, checking to make sure the liquid is not boiling.
  6. Remove the ribs to a warm platter and cover.
  7. Stir in the vinegar or lemon juice and dill and cook, uncovered, for another 5 minutes.
  8. Add the cabbage to the platter and serve.

 

Watch the Country-Style Spareribs with Red Cabbage and Apples Here:

 

 

 

Roasted Beet Salad with Sherry Wine Vinaigrette

Roasted Beet Salad with Sherry Wine Vinaigrette

I love beets, but this is another food my husband won’t eat. For some reason, he doesn’t like spring vegetables: asparagus, beets, peas, sugar snap peas and snow peas. Roasted beet salad with sherry wine vinaigrette is quick and easy to make. Eat it by itself or toss into salads.

Golden Beet

Spring vegetables are transition vegetables from the hearty winter gourds and root vegetables that bring a welcome lightness and color to the table after a long, cold, snowy winter. They reflect the rebirth of nature and, of course, they’re all delicious! Except to him.

Beets, are small and the greens are plentiful in spring. As the season continues, the beet bulb grows bigger and, fortunately, they are pretty frost resistant making them a year-round staple.

Roasted Beets

Candy Cane Beet

Roast and peel the beets, cut into any shape you like: slices, quarters or cubes. Watch our video on roasting beets and sautéing beet greens here.

Prepare the vinaigrette, coat the beets generously and marinate in the refrigerator at least four hours or overnight. The beets keep up to 3-4 days in the refrigerator and are best served at room temperature.

This recipe for beet salad includes peppery arugula, and chunks of warm goat cheese. Add some toasted nuts, such as pistachio or walnuts for a little texture.

Beet and goat cheese

Watch our Roasted Beet Salad Video Here

 

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Roasted Beet Salad with Sherry Wine Vinaigrett

Roasted Beet Salad with Sherry Wine Vinaigrette

Roasted beet salad with sherry wine vinaigrette is quick and easy to make. Warm some goat cheese, toss arugula and beets together and add dollops of the warm cheese.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Yield: 2/3 cup vinaigrette 1x
  • Category: Salad, Salad Dressing & Vinaigrettes
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Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons walnut oil
  • 2 tablespoons Sherry wine vinegar
  • 1 small shallot minced
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • pinch of salt
  • a couple of cranks on the pepper mill
  • 4 roasted beets cut into slices, cubes

Instructions

  1. Combine the oils, vinegar, shallot, mustard, salt and pepper in a covered jar and shake or whisk in a bowl.
  2. Pour generously over beets and let marinate in the refrigerator at least 4 hours or overnight. Best served at room temperature.

Notes

Warm some goat cheese, toss arugula and beets together and add dollops of the warm cheese.

 

Tuscan Kale and Bean Soup

Tuscan Kale and Bean Soup

Quick and easy Tuscan kale and bean soup is a hearty vegan recipe. It’s also dairy-free, gluten-free and fits a paleo diet! If you can’t find Tuscan or Lacinto kale, substitute escarole or any other hearty green.

Chop your vegetables small so a few different pieces fit on the spoon at once for best flavor and enjoyment.

Tuscan Kale and Bean Soup

Rinse and drain the kale or greens and coarsely chop.

Tuscan Kale and Bean Soup

Don’t overcook the greens to maintain a vibrant green and slight texture.

Tuscan Kale and Bean Soup

If you’re family doesn’t favor meatless dishes, simply brown 1 pound of loose sausage in the oil before sweating the aromatics or add 3 cups shredded cooked chicken at the end.

A little grated Asiago cheese makes a delicious garnish.

Watch the Tuscan Kale and Bean Soup Video Here.

 

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Tuscan Kale and Bean Soup

Tuscan Kale and Bean Soup

This is a quick and easy soup to make. If you can’t find Tuscan or Lacinto kale, substitute escarole or any other hearty green. If you’re family doesn’t favor meatless dishes, simply brown 1 pound of loose sausage in the oil before sweating the aromatics or add 3 cups shredded cooked chicken at the end. Parmesan cheese on top is optional!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeldd
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 8 two-cup servings 1x
  • Category: Soup
  • Cuisine: Italian
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Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups diced onion
  • 1 cup diced celery
  • 1 cup diced carrots
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 teaspoons Kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 6 cups stock or water
  • 1 can (x ounces) fire-roasted tomatoes
  • 1 bunch washed, trimmed and coarsely chopped Tuscan kale, or other hearty green
  • 1 can (19 ounces) cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
  • Garnish: freshly grated Parmesan cheese, optional

Instructions

  1. Heat the oil in a 7-quart Dutch oven or large heavy-bottomed saucepan, with a cover, over medium heat.
  2. Note: If you choose to use sausage in the soup cook in the hot oil until browned, using a wooden spoon to break the sausage in to a small crumble.
  3. Stir in the onions, celery, carrots, garlic, salt and pepper; cover and sweat, stirring occasionally for 5 minutes. Lower the heat a little if the vegetables are browning.
  4. Add the stock and tomatoes, bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes.
  5. Stir in the beans and kale or other greens, return to a boil, lower the heat and cook another 8 minutes or until the greens are tender, but not soft.
  6. Serve with freshly grated Parmesan cheese, if you like.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: two cups

 

Hard Boiled Egg

eggs

The key to a successful hard boiled egg is gentle heat and slow cooking. By using this method, the egg is moist and tender with no off odor and a perfectly yellow egg yolk.

Overexposure to high heat releases sulfur from the egg white and iron from the yolk, which results in that unpleasant odor and gray-green coloration on the outer yolk.

Place eggs in a pan large enough to hold the eggs so they are covered by two inches of cold water. Bring to a boil, turn off the heat, cover and let sit for 12 minutes.

Plunge the eggs into an ice bath and let cool completely.

Crack and peel for delicate and delicious hard boiled eggs!

Here’s a recipe for Curried Devil Eggs.

Roasted Beets and Sautéed Beet Greens

Sauteed Beet Greens

Beets come in an array of sizes and colors. There are a variety of ways to prepare and serve beets: roasting, grilling, boiling, and shredded raw. Today were focusing on roasted beets. The beets I bought had beautiful greens and we’re including a bonus recipe for sautéed beet stems and greens!

Roasted Beets

Candy Cane Beet

Purchase beets of a similar size for even cooking. Alternatively, cook similar size beets in separate packets. Beets also come in assorted colors, the familiar red beet, candy cane beets – red with white stripes and golden beets. They all taste relatively the same, use the assorted colors to add vibrancy to your dish.

Golden Beet

Golden Beet

Baby beets (teeny tiny bulbs) have delicious greens, just wash the greens and beets and serve with the bulb on. More mature beets have tender greens, just slice the stems away from the bulb and cook separately. Older beets have brown, tough leaves and  are less appealing.

To clean, remove the stems and leaves from the bulb. Scrub the beet with a stiff vegetable brush and remove the root end. You can either leave the top on or not.

Roasted Beets

Set up heavy duty aluminum foil on your countertop and brush with a little olive oil. Place the cleaned beets on foil, wrap tightly and roast until fork tender at 400 degrees F. The timing will depend on the size of the beets, small ones 45 minutes, medium 1 hour, larger a little longer. Be sure to package the beets for roasting according to size. Cool and peel.

Roasted Beets

 Sautéed Beet Greens

Sauteed Beet Greens

Watch the Roasted Beets Video Here
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Sautéed Beet Greens

Roasted Beets

Cut the stems off the beets and thoroughly rinse in lots of cold water to remove any grit; spin dry. Remove the stems from the leaves and mince; keep the leaves whole or chopped.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Category: Vegan/Vegetarian
  • Method: Saute
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Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • beet stems
  • beet greens
  • coarse salt, to taste
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Heat the oil in a skillet over medium-high heat and toss in the garlic, shallots, chopped stems, salt and pepper and cook for 5 minutes.
  2. Add 1/4 cup cold water, greens, salt and pepper; cook until wilted.