Category: Gluten-Free

Lemon-Tarragon Rotisserie Chicken

Roasted Chicken

I purchased a rotisserie several years ago, which I love, especially for poultry. The rotisserie self bastes and browns evenly all over. Delicious. One of my favorite rubs for chicken is lemon and tarragon. Try this Lemon-Tarragon Rotisserie Chicken, it’s moist and flavorful. You won’t be disappointed.

 

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Lemon-Tarragon Rotisserie Chicken

A rotisserie self bastes and browns evenly all over and with a lemon tarragon rub, this Lemon-Tarragon Rotisserie Chicken is moist and flavorful.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 80 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 50 minutes
  • Yield: 8 portions 1x
  • Category: Chicken
  • Method: Roast/Rotisserie
Scale

Ingredients

1 four- to five-pound whole roasting chicken
1 ½ teaspoons Kosher salt, divided
1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
½ cup chopped fresh parsley
¼ cup chopped fresh tarragon
10 garlic cloves, minced
zest and juice of 1 small lemon
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Instructions

Remove giblets from the chicken and either toss or freeze for another purpose.

Place the chicken on a cutting board and pat with paper towel inside and out to remove excess moisture.

Slip your fingers under the breast and wiggle them until the entire skin separates from the flesh. Then take your fingers and run them under the thigh and leg skin. If the skin rips a bit, don’t worry, you can fix it with a couple of toothpicks. Repeat on the other side.

Season the cavity with ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper.

Combine the parsley, tarragon, garlic, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon pepper together in a small bowl.

Take 1 tablespoon of the mixture and place inside the seasoned chicken cavity and rub it around.

Scoop one-half of the mixture onto one side of the chicken and using your fingers, spread evenly over the breast and down onto the leg and thigh. Repeat on the other side.

Tie the chicken and season with remaining salt and pepper.

At this point you can either cook the bird or wrap it in film and store it in the refrigerator until dinner.

Rotisserie Method

Take the chicken out of the refrigerator 30 minutes before cooking.

Place the chicken on the skewers and into the rotisserie. The rotisserie cooks faster than the oven, about 45-50 minutes. Internal temperature should read 175ºF.

Oven Roasting Method

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Place the chicken on a roasting rack in a roaster.

Roast for an hour and ten minutes, check internal temperature, and adjust time, if necessary.

Notes

To repair ripped breast skin, just pull the skin together and weave a toothpick through one side and then the other.

Corn Chowder with Spicy Shrimp

It’s late September and fresh corn is disappearing. What’s available is mature. The cobs are thick waisted and the kernels are portly, more starch than juice. Yet I hate to miss having fresh corn when it’s still available. Time to make a Corn Chowder with Spicy Shrimp!

Method

Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large, covered saucepan or 7-quart Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onions, celery, and garlic. Stir to combine, cover the pot, and sweat until translucent about 5 minutes.

Onions, celery, and garlic in melted butter.

Onions, celery, and garlic in melted butter.

Onions, celery, and garlic in melted butter.

Onion mixture after sweating in covered pan for 5 minutes – note the difference in color and texture.

Pour in 2 cups of a dry white wine (not too sweet or too oaky – the flavors will become too pronounced as the wine reduces). Bring to a boil, lower heat to a good simmer, and reduce liquid to about 1/4 cup.

Two cups of white wine.

Two cups of wine added to onion mixture.

Liquids reduced to about 1/4 cup.

In the meantime, take your shucked corn and cut off the kernels with a sharp chef’s knife. Then scrape the empty cobs to get at the “corn milk.”

Corn kernels removed with a chef’s knife and “corn milk” released by scraping the edge of the chef’s knife down the cob.

Cut the potatoes into 1/2-inch cubes. If you have French-fry cutter, it’s perfect for this task. Just push those potatoes through and then slice the sticks into cubes. Otherwise, slice the potato lengthwise into 1/2-inch pieces, turn and cut again into 1/2-inch sticks, and then into 1/2-inch cubes.

Potato cubes.

Once the wine has reduced, add the corn, potatoes, stock, tomatoes, salt and pepper. Stir to combine; raise the heat to high and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and continue cooking until potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes.

All ingredients combined and ready to simmer.

Stir in the heavy cream and adjust seasonings. The soup is ready to serve, or chill and refrigerate for later use.

Chowder with cream added.

Dinnertime: If you have chilled the soup, reheat, stirring occasionally; otherwise, keep the soup on a low flame while preparing the shrimp.

Cleaned shrimp sliced in half lengthwise.

Shrimp cut into bite-size pieces.

Shrimp tossed with green-chile-lime rub.

Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons butter in a medium sauté pan. When the butter foams, add the seasoned shrimp. Cook until pink and firm, about 2-3 minutes.

Butter has melted and is foaming – perfect time to add shrimp.

Seasoned shrimp (don’t forget to add salt if your rub is salt free) added to melted butter.

Fully cooked shrimp, ready to add to soup.

Ladle the soup into bowls, top with the shrimp and a sprinkle of chopped cilantro

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Corn Chowder with Spicy Shrimp

It’s late September and fresh corn is disappearing. What’s available is mature. The cobs are thick waisted and the kernels are portly, more starch than juice. Yet I hate to miss having fresh corn when it’s still available. Time to make a Corn Chowder with Spicy Shrimp!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 40
  • Cook Time: 40
  • Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Yield: 2 quarts 1x
  • Category: Soup/Chowder
Scale

Ingredients

¼ cup unsalted butter, divided
1 1/2 cups diced onion (about 1 large onion)
2 large celery stalks, diced
1 minced clove of garlic
2 cups dry white wine, not an oaky wine
6 ears of corn, kernels and milk removed
2 Russet potatoes cut int ½-inch cubes
4 cups stock (chicken or vegetable)
1 can (15.5 ounces) fire roasted tomatoes
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
1 cup heavy cream
1 pound large shrimp (x count), peeled, deveined and cut into bite-size pieces
2 teaspoons spice mix, such as a Cajun, Creole or Jerk seasoning mix

Garnish
chopped cilantro

Instructions

Melt the butter in a large Dutch oven or saucepot over medium heat.

Stir in the onions and celery, cover and sweat for 5 minutes.

Add the wine, not too sweet or oaky ,the flavors become pronounced as the wine reduces; bring to a boil, lower heat to a good simmer. and reduce liquid to about 1/4 cup.

In the meantime, take your shucked corn and cut off the kernels with a sharp chef’s knife. Then scrape the empty cobs to get at the “corn milk.”

Cut the potatoes into 1/2-inch cubes. If you have French-fry cutter, it’s perfect for this task. Just push those potatoes through and then slice the sticks into cubes. Otherwise, slice the potato lengthwise into 1/2-inch pieces, turn and cut again into 1/2-inch sticks, and then into 1/2-inch cubes.

Once the wine has reduced, add the corn, potatoes, stock, tomatoes, salt and pepper. Stir to combine; raise the heat to high and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and continue cooking until potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes.

Stir in the heavy cream and adjust seasonings. The soup is ready to serve, or chill and refrigerate for later use.

Dinnertime: If you have chilled the soup, reheat, stirring occasionally; otherwise, keep the soup on a low flame while preparing the shrimp.

Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons butter in a medium sauté pan. When the butter foams, add the seasoned shrimp. Cook until pink and firm, about 3-4 minutes.

Ladle the soup into bowls, top with the shrimp and a sprinkle of chopped cilantro.

Notes

For very large shrimp, butterfly and cut into bitesize pieces.

Grilled Corn on the Cob

I always find myself chuckling when I watch a food show or read a recipe for grilled corn on the cob. So much effort for such a simple dish.

The typical procedure is to pull back the husk, remove the silk, return the husk to its original position, tie the cob to hold the husks in place, and then soak for some time. When it’s finally deemed ready, they put the corn on the grill and cook it to death. The soaking provides water for steam to cook the corn, and the extended length of time is to dry out the husk to get some grilled effect. I have always found corn grilled in this fashion overcooked and starchy. More importantly, it is totally unnecessary.

Serve with our Grilled Pork Chops with the grilled corn on the cob.

Method

The easy way is to take your shucked corn, toss with a teeny bit of olive oil and a light sprinkling of salt and pepper.

Place ears on a preheated grill and cook, covered, on medium-high heat for 5 to 6 minutes, turning every 60 to 90 seconds.

Some kernels will caramelize, most desirable, and the rest just cook through. The natural water content in the corn is sufficient to aid in this process and the result is juicy, perfectly cooked, sweet corn.

Done – nice caramelization and fully cooked in only 5-6 minutes!

Pulled Pork

Pulled Pork

We love pulled pork, but I’m not a barbecue expert and had to peruse many recipes before I was able to decide how to put this together. My daughter requested the moist version using vinegar, instead of a dry rub, which is my preference too. The finished pork is tangy and fall-apart tender.  We’re having tis with Cheddar cheese biscuits and a vinegar coleslaw.

To infuse a smoky flavor I sparingly used ground chipotle that offers heat and earthy undertones. Most recipes incorporated either a tablespoon of ground mustard or a couple of tablespoons of regular mustard. I thought 1/3 cup of a stone-ground was the best choice.

All ingredients measured and the pork shoulder.

1 large onion diced – about 2 cups

Four smashed garlic cloves – place the side of your knife over each clove and smack with the heel of your hand.

Stir onion, ketchup, mustard, brown sugar, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, and chipotle.

After 2 hours, notice the expelled juices. It is definitely not necessary to add more liquid.

Finished pulled pork

Finished pulled pork

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Pulled Pork

Serve this with mini Cheddar cheese muffins or biscuits and a side of creamy coleslaw.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 8 hours
  • Total Time: 8 hours 30 minutes
  • Yield: 10 portions 1x
  • Category: Barbecue
  • Method: Slow Cooking
Scale

Ingredients

1 large onion, large dice
1/2 cup Ketchup
1/3 cup stone-ground mustard
1/4 cup packed brown sugar (either dark or light)
1/4 cup apple-cider vinegar
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
4 smashed garlic cloves
1 tablespoon ground chipotle red
3 pounds pork shoulder, trimmed of fat
1 tablespoon coarse salt

Instructions

Mix the onion, ketchup, mustard, sugar, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, and chipotle together in a slow cooker.

Season the trimmed pork with salt and pepper and place on top of the sauce mixture. Turn the meat a couple of times to coat with the sauce.

Set the slow cooker on low heat and timer for 8 hours; turn the meat every 2 hours. Place the pork on a board and let cook for 20 minutes.

Shred the pork with a couple of forks and return to the pot. Cool and refrigerate overnight. Remove the hardened fat and discard.

Serve or freeze for another day.

Notes

Don’t be tempted to add more liquid; the meat will expel juices and fat and add volume. You want the sauce to have an intense in flavor!

Applesauce

 It’s always fun when your children come home for a visit and it’s especially fun for us when they bring along a bunch of  hungry friends; especially when they have no food restrictions/requirements. They were in for a surprise as I was experimenting with turkey meatloaf. It was okay, not spectacular. My
applesauce on the other hand is a proven success for many years.
 Applesauce is one of the easiest recipes to make and one I taught every semester in the first week of our food lab at NYU. I hope none of my students ever purchased jarred applesauce again!
Purchase a mix of at least 3 varieties, such as tart Granny Smith, sweet McIntosh and Golden Delicious with its honey-like overtones. There are two methods for making applesauce. The first is good for a small batch, the second for large batches.
applesauce
Peeled and Cored Method
Peel, core and cut the apples into chunks – the smaller the pieces the faster they cook down.
applesauce

Pop these into a covered sauce pan with 1/4 cup cold water. Turn the heat on low and stir occasionally  Once the apples begin to break down turn the heat up a little. The apples are ready when easily crushed against the side of the pan with the back of a wooden spoon or spatula. Mash and season with ground cinnamon.

applesauce

Unpeeled Method
Wash the apples and cut into chunks – the smaller the pieces the faster they cook down.  Pop these into a covered sauce pan with 1/4 cup cold water. Turn the heat on low and stir occasionally. Once the apples begin to break down turn the heat up a little. The apples are ready when easily crushed against the side of the pan with the back of a wooden spoon or spatula.
Ladle small batches into a food mill placed over a large bowl or saucepan and process to remove skins, core and seeds. Scrape the food mill clean between batches. Season with ground cinnamon.
Applesauce is best served warm, nuke in the microwave for 30 seconds, stir and nuke again.
Freezes well.


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Applesauce

applesauce

Use a variety of apples, such as Granny Smith, McIntosh and Golden Delicious, for a complex tasting applesauce.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 2 cups 1x
  • Category: Fruit
Scale

Ingredients

9 apples
1/4 cup cold water
ground cinnamon, to taste

Instructions

Peeled and Cored Method

Peel, core and cut into chunks – the smaller the pieces the faster they cook down.

Pop these into a covered sauce pan with 1/4 cup cold water. Turn the heat on low and stir occasionally. Once the apples begin to break down turn the heat up a little. The apples are ready when easily crushed against the side of the pan with the back of a wooden spoon or spatula. Mash and season with ground cinnamon.

Unpeeled Method

Wash the apples and cut into chunks – the smaller the pieces the faster they cook down.  Pop these into a covered sauce pan with 1/4 cup cold water. Turn the heat on low and stir occasionally. Once the apples begin to break down turn the heat up a little. The apples are ready when easily crushed against the side of the pan with the back of a wooden spoon or spatula.

Ladle small batches into a food mill placed over a large bowl or saucepan and process to remove skins, core and seeds. Scrape the food mill clean between batches. Season with ground cinnamon.

Notes

Applesauce is best served warm, nuke in the microwave for 30 seconds, stir and nuke again.

Freezes well.

 

Pan Roasted Pork Chops

My plans for dinner, grilled pork chops with haricots verts in garlic butter and mashed sweet potatoes with goat cheese were spoiled by the weather.

It’s a dreary, snowy-rainy, rainy-snowy day. I shoveled this morning, something I usually enjoy, but the snow is heavy and I finished, an hour later soaked and cold to the bone. The snow continued and the shoveled parts were clogging up with slush again. What is really bugging me are the thick pork chops for dinner that I was planning on grilling. But who wants to go out in the rain and slush to cook. Believe me, I have gone out in many a bad weather, but this one just makes you want to hunker down and avoid the cold, chilly, rain and the slippery deck.

The options are to broil or pan roast the chops. The nice thing about pan roasting is you can make a quick sauce from the fond in the pan.

Pan Roasted Pork Chops

Generously season both sides of the pork chops salt and pepper. Let sit for 4 hours or overnight.

Bring out the chops about 30 minutes before cooking to let them warm up a bit. This helps keep the juicy.

Preheat oven to 350-degrees F.

Pour oil into a large skillet with an ovenproof handle and place over high heat.

Place the chops into the hot pan and sear for about 2 minutes or when the chops are nicely caramelized.

Turn and cook for another 2 minutes. 

Place seared chops into preheated oven and cook until internal temperature reads 145ºF for medium (the chops will be slightly pink inside) or longer if you want them well done. The timing will depend on how thick the chops are and if they came directly from the refrigerator (cold) or sat on the counter for a short time (less cold), but figure at a minimum for a thick chop about 10-12 minutes.

Remove chops to a warm serving plate and place hot pan over medium-high heat on the stovetop.

Add the wine, shallot, and herbs to the pan, scraping the bottom of the pan to loosen the fond (browned tidbits left from the caramelized chops). Return the pan to the stovetop over medium heat and cook for 2 minutes. Add the stock, bring to a boil, lower the neat to a gentle simmer and cook for 3 minutes.   

Pour over the chops and serve.

 

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Pan Roasted Pork Chops

pan roasted pork chop with red wine pan sauce

Here’s a quick and easy method to pan roast pork chops and then make a delicious pan sauce to serve over the chops.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 25 minutes
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x
  • Category: Pork
  • Method: Pan Roast
Scale

Ingredients

4 pork chops
kosher salt
freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 cup dry red wine
1 shallot, minced
2 teaspoons dried bouquet garni
1 cup broth or stock (vegetable, chicken, or beef)

Instructions

Generously season both sides of the pork chops salt and pepper. Let sit for 4 hours or overnight.

Bring out the chops about 30 minutes before cooking to let them warm up a bit. This helps keep the juicy.

Preheat oven to 350-degrees F.

Pour oil into a large skillet with an ovenproof handle and place over high heat.

Place the chops into the hot pan and sear for about 2 minutes or when the chops are nicely caramelized.

Turn and cook for another 2 minutes. 

Place seared chops into preheated oven and cook until internal temperature reads 145ºF for medium (the chops will be slightly pink inside) or longer if you want them well done. The timing will depend on how thick the chops are and if they came directly from the refrigerator (cold) or sat on the counter for a short time (less cold), but figure at a minimum for a thick chop about 10-12 minutes.

Remove chops to a warm serving plate and place hot pan over medium-high heat on the stovetop.

Add the wine, shallot, and herbs to the pan, scraping the bottom of the pan to loosen the fond (browned tidbits left from the caramelized chops). Return the pan to the stovetop over medium heat and cook for 2 minutes. Add the stock, bring to a boil, lower the neat to a gentle simmer and cook for 3 minutes.   

Pour over the chops and serve.

Keywords: pan roast, oven roast, pork chops, pan sauce, red wine pan sauce,