Category: Fruit

Grilled Bananas

Grilled Bananas

Grilled peaches, grilled plums, grilled watermelon, grilled pineapple – all pretty common. Grilled bananas??? Why not!

Grilled bananas are delicious and great for breakfast on cereal, granola, pancakes or waffles. They also make a great dessert over ice cream! Check out my ice cream cookbook here!

Grilled Bananas

The key to success is to use underripe bananas. A ripe banana is soft, softens more on the grill and gets mushy. Taste a sliver of the banana. Want it sweeter? Brush with a little honey or agave before grilling.

There is no “recipe” for this. Use as many bananas as you like, brush lightly with a sweetener, if needed. Place on a hot grill and cook a minute, turn and cook a minute, turn and cook a minute, turn and cook a minute. Sprinkle with cinnamon and serve.

Sprinkle immediately with cinnamon to release the essential oils and aroma.

Watch the Grilled Bananas Video Here.

Deep Dish Apple Pie

Apple Pie

 

Apple pie is a family favorite. Apple orchards are plentiful in Rochester, NY, my hometown and we always have a nice assortment of varieties on hand and drink lots of fresh-pressed apple cider. Deep Dish Apple Pie is just an excuse to use more apples!

I think most people are familiar with apple pie ala mode, but in our family, the pie was always served with sliced extra-sharp Cheddar cheese on the side. The cider mills we bought our apples and cider at also sold cheese. After all, cheese and apples are a natural pairing!

Apple Pie

For a more interesting and complex pie, use at least three types of apples, such as Granny Smith, McIntosh and Rome. The sweet, tart and soft, firm textures blend nicely. Nuts, raisins and/or dried cranberries are a nice way to mix it up a little, the nuts provide texture and the dried fruit soaks up the apple juices.

Don’t forget to pierce the top of the pie dough several times. This allows the steam to escape and keeps your crust intact. The egg wash creates a shiny, golden brown crust – don’t skip it.

Apple Pie

I’ve never seen a pie recipe butters the pie pan. I think the high fat content of the pie dough makes everyone think it won’t stick, but it does, and the bottom crust doesn’t easily release. So save those butter wrappers from the pastry dough and use them to butter the pie pan. You can thank me later!

Apple Pie

This recipe calls for a double crust, add 2 tablespoons sugar to the recipe for a sweet crust.

The pie can be frozen uncooked and baked from the frozen state. Wrap tightly and store for only a month. Bake at 450 for 20 minutes, then lower the heat to 350 and bake another hour or until the apples are tender when pierced with a knife.

Apple Pie

Print

Deep Dish Apple Pie

Apple Pie

For a more interesting and complex pie, use at least three types of apples, such as Granny Smith, McIntosh and Rome. The sweet, tart and soft, firm textures blend nicely. Nuts, raisins and/or dried cranberries are a nice way to mix it up a little, the nuts provide texture and the dried fruit soaks up the apple juices. Serve with extra-sharp Cheddar cheese on the side.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Yield: 1 9-inch pie
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

  • One double-crust pie recipe with 2 tablespoons granulated sugar added
  • 9 apples, peeled, cored and cut into eighths (~ 2.5 pounds)
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • juice of one lemon
  • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped walnuts, optional
  • 1/4 cup raisins, optional
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon coarse salt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 egg lightly beaten

Instructions

  1. Roll out the two pie crusts and line the bottom of a dish dish pie dish with one. See post on how to roll out a pie crust.
  2. Combine the apple slices, lemon zest, lemon juice, chopped walnuts, raisins, sugar, all-purpose flour, cinnamon and salt in a large mixing bowl.
  3. Pour mixture into a prepared bottom crust in a 10-inch deep dish pie pan and tuck in the fruit to fit tightly.
  4. Cover with the top crust, crimp, and cut steam wholes.
  5. Brush crust with the egg wash.
  6. Bake in preheated oven for one hour, or until apples are soft when pierced with a knife.
  7. Remove to a baker’s rack and cool.

Notes

The pie can be frozen uncooked and baked from the frozen state. Wrap tightly and store for only a month. Bake at 450 for 20 minutes, then lower the heat to 350 and bake another hour or until the apples tender when pierced with a knife.

Triple Berry Crisp

Fruit Dessert History

Quick and easy Triple Berry Crisp is versatile. Not only is this a wonderful dessert but it also makes an excellent breakfast. The recipe calls for whole-wheat flour, whole oats, brown sugar, almonds, cinnamon, salt and melted butter for the topping and a bounty of fresh fruit – a great way to start the day!

Wash the fruit, drain a little, slide the berries into a deep dish pie pan, cover with the crisp topping and bake for a little over an hour, until the berries are bubbling. No sugar needed in the fruit unless you find it very tart and then I recommend  only a sprinkling of a tablespoon or two over the top of the fruit.

Fruit Dessert History

Make several batches of the topping at once, minus the butter, and keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Use 1 ½ cups of the topping mixed with 6 tablespoons melted butter and combine over 7 cups of fruit.

Fruit Dessert History

Here’s the video, but don’t miss out on the history of the crisp and similar type fruit desserts below!

FOOD HISTORY

Bird’s Nest Pudding, Brown Betty, Buckle, Cobbler, Crisp, Crumble, Grunt, Pandowdy, Slump, Sonker – all names and variations on “old-fashioned” English and Colonial American fruit desserts. If old-fashioned means out of date, I beg to differ. These recipes are wonderful ways to make use of abundant seasonal fresh fruit and are not just for dessert.

The common denominator is the recipes all use fruit, sweeteners, and usually have a crusty top. What varies is the type of fruit, though apples predominate, and the type of pastry that covers the top or on occasion is broken up and mixed into the fruit bottom.

Fruit Dessert History

What’s in a Name

Names are regional and somewhat like barbecue, each style is fiercely defended. The sonker has its own festival in Lowgap, North Carolina and proudly touts the abundance of fruit contained in a sonker compared to a stingy cobbler.

Bird’s nest pudding is made with sliced apples covered with a mixture of milk, eggs, and sugar, and  baked until set, a custard.

Brown betty has layers of fruit, crumbled pastry, fruit, and crumbled pastry. The crumbled pastry absorbs fruit juices and thickens into a pudding-like consistency.

Yellow cake is the base for a buckle with berries strewn across it and topped with crumbs, which is then cut into squares after baking – a precursor to a fruit bar, perhaps.

A cobbler is a deep dish dessert covered with thick biscuit dough, either a solid layer, or cut into rounds, resembling cobbles – hence the name – sprinkled with sugar, and baked until golden brown. The thickness of the biscuit overwhelms the dish and is why Sonker fans claim to have a better fruit to crust ratio.

Grunts and slumps are stovetop versions of a cobbler, which originated in England. The biscuits are steamed in a cast-iron skillet and resemble dumplings. The noise from the bubbling fruit “grunts” as it stews.

To make a pandowdy, the dough is sliced and pressed into the fruit during the last stage of baking. Early recipes referred to this step as dowdying.

Fruit History Dessert

My Favorite

So many to choose from, but for me it’s an easy choice, the crisp, or crumble as the British say, is my favorite. Fruit on the bottom covered with a layer of flour, brown sugar, whole oats and sometimes nuts that is traditionally rubbed with butter. The butter melts in the oven and “crisps” the top. I find, however, that melted butter added to the dry ingredients does a better job. The fat is totally incorporated into the crust and prevents a partially crisp, partially powdery top. Below is my recipe for Triple Berry Crisp.

Print

Triple Berry Crisp

berry crisp

Not only is this a wonderful dessert but it also makes an excellent breakfast. The recipe calls for whole-wheat flour, whole oats, brown sugar, almonds, cinnamon, salt and melted butter for the topping and a bounty of fresh fruit – a great way to start the day!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 70 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 40 minutes
  • Yield: 1 nine-inch deep dish crisp
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

  • 6-8 cups mixed berries, rinsed and drained
  • 1/3 cup blanched almonds
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar (light or dark)
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup whole oats (not instant)
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 6 tablespoons melted butter

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Slide the berries into a 9-inch deep-dish pie plate.
  3. Place the almonds and sugar in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the blade and finely grind the nuts.
  4. Add the flour, oats, cinnamon, and salt; pulse just enough to combine the ingredients.
  5. Pour the melted butter over the mixture and pulse until well incorporated.
  6. Take handfuls of the crisp topping and cover the fruit. Place in preheated oven and bake for 80 minutes or until the fruit begins to bubble.
  7. Remove and cool.
  8. Serve warm or at room temperature with a dollop of whipped cream or ice cream.

Notes

Use frozen, unsweetened fruit in the off season.

Make up multiple batches of the topping, minus the butter, and keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Use 1 ½ cups of the topping mixed with 6 tablespoons melted butter and combine over 7 cups of fruit. It’s so quick and easy to make these crisps spur of the moment.

 

 

How To Clean Berries

Here’s a quick primer on how to clean berries; a necessary task.

It always frustrates me when I read an article or hear someone say it’s not important to clean berries because they’re too delicate. I’ve even read that raspberry skins are so thin they let water in, ruining the fruit. I wonder what happens when it rains?

We were at a restaurant many years ago, a very well known and well regarded place. When I went to the dessert table, the bowl of raspberries looked like it was moving. The berries were covered with tiny bugs. Yuk!

It’s a simple task to clean delicate berries. Fill a large bowl with cold water, gently dump the berries in, swish around and scoop them out with your hands into a colander. Drain and use. It’s that simple!

My mother uses hydrogen peroxide to clean all her fruits and vegetables, which I’m not a fan of. There are websites that recommend a combination of vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide to remove pesticides. I’ve checked the FDA, CDC and www.foodsafety.gov websites and can’t find any recommendations other than using cold water to wash fruit.

Here’s a recipe for Triple Berry Crisp.

Be sure to read the article on the history of fruit desserts following the recipe. Similar to barbecue, these fruit desserts have staunch followers and specific fruit and cake-type fillings.

How to Prepare Citrus Supremes

Do you ever get tired of peeling an orange and then scraping off the pith to get to the sweet juicy segments?  Eating a grapefruit with the segment skin on is too bitter for my taste and I always feel that
too much of the grapefruit goes to waste when you halve it and use a knife or grapefruit spoon to free the segments . That’s why I love citrus supremes. These glistening little jewels perk up any salad. Macerate the slices in a liqueur for a couple of hours for a delightful and refreshing dessert. Or just let them fall into a bowl and devour them!

Grapefruit Supremes

Take a grapefruit, orange, lemon, lime or any citrus fruit

IMG_3843Slice off one end to expose the flesh.

How To: Make Citrus Supremes

Slice off the other end.

IMG_3849

Stand the fruit on one of the flat ends and slide the knife down the sides, top to bottom, to remove  the peel and pith.

IMG_3852

Continue all the way around the fruit. Be sure to get all the pith, and as little of the fruit as possible. Trim any remaining pith.

IMG_3853

Hold the fruit in your hand, over a bowl to capture the flowing juices, and slide the blade down the side of the segment separating it from it’s outer skin. Once you reach the center of the fruit, tilt the knife under the segment and lift it up and off the other side.

IMG_3858

Repeat with each segment.

IMG_3860

Squeeze to get all the juice.

IMG_3863

 

Print

How to Prepare Citrus Supremes

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 10 mins
  • Total Time: 10 mins

Ingredients

  • Grapefruit, orange, lemon or lime

Instructions

  1. Slice off both ends of the fruit, exposing the flesh.
  2. Stand the fruit on one of the flat sides and draw the knife down top to bottom, removing the peel and pith. Continue all the way around the grapefruit. Trim any remaining pith.
  3. Hold the grapefruit in your hand, over a bowl to catch the flowing juices, and slide the blade down the segment to separate it from the skin. Stop at the center, tilt the knife under the segment and lift off.
  4. Continue until all the segments are removed.
  5. Squeeze the juice into a small container.

 

Cranberry Sauce

It isn’t thanksgiving without a cranberry dish, and the vibrant cranberry red is a welcome addition to the earthy colors of the Thanksgiving turkey and traditional sides. Cranberries are tart, so tart as to be inedible without some sweetener. This Cranberry Sauce recipe, however, goes lighter on the sugar to highlight the cranberry and complement the other naturally sweet sides, such as sweet potatoes, butternut squash and cornbread. For an interesting little twist, I’ve added a couple of Clementines.

Method

Rinse and pick through the cranberries for any bad ones.

IMG_1206
Bring the cranberries, water and sugar to a boil in a medium-size covered pot.

IMG_1219
Lower the heat to a gentle boil, leave the cover ajar, the cranberries pop and spatter.

IMG_1221
Cook until cranberries are thick, about 12 minutes.

IMG_1243
In the meantime, peel the Clementines, and remove all the pith and strings.

IMG_1214

Cut the cleaned Clementines in half and stir in.

IMG_1234 - Version 2

Serve at room temperature.

 

Cranberry Sauce Recipe
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 8 portions
Ingredients
  • 2 cups (1 package) fresh cranberries
  • 1/4 cup cold water
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 Clementines, peeled and cut in half
Instructions
  1. Rinse and pick through the cranberries for any bad ones.
  2. Bring the cranberries, water and sugar to a boil in a medium-size covered pot.
  3. Lower the heat to a gentle boil, leave the cover ajar, the cranberries pop and spatter.
  4. Cook until cranberries are thick, about 12 minutes.
  5. Stir in the Clementine segment halves. Serve at room temperature.

 

Apple Pie with Crumb Topping

Honeypie’s Recipes thanks all the brave men and women and their families who serve or have served our country by offering a Veteran’s Day Apple Pie with Crumb Topping recipe.

We decided to pay tribute to our troops with an apple pie recipe. When journalists’ asked WWII soldiers why they were fighting, the frequent response was:  “For Mom and apple pie.”

Interestingly, apples are not native to the Americas; they were brought here from Europe. Apple pie became a symbol of prosperity and national pride in the 19th and 20th centuries. Hence the expression “As American as apple pie.” We took the liberty of making a version from the Dutch, which uses a crumb topping instead of a double crust.

Traditional accompaniments for apple pie are whipped cream, ice cream, or thin slices of sharp Cheddar cheese.

Single Pie Crust

Dump the flour, sugar, cinnamon and salt into a large bowl. Cut the butter in half lengthwise and then into 8 slices. Toss these into the flour and coat the individual pieces well. Cut the butter with a pastry blender until the butter is in tiny pieces about the size of a pea.

Use the butter wrapper to grease the inside of the pie dish.

Measure 1/4 cup water, add vanilla extract, and drizzle over the flour. Toss gently with your fingers to incorporate the moisture. Form a small clump of dough. If it crumbles easily, add another tablespoon of water and toss. Repeat the crumble test. Add another teaspoon or two of cold water if it’s still dry and repeat the crumble test.

Once the dough holds together, push it all together into a mound and place on a piece of plastic wrap.

Wrap securely and push down to form a round disc. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes to hydrate the flour.

IMG_0787

Crumb Top

Place the sugar and walnuts in the base of a food processor and pulse until the nuts are mealy. Add the flour, oat, cinnamon and salt and pulse five-six times.

Dump the crumble mixture into a medium-sized mixing bowl. Pour the melted butter onto the crumble mixture and stir until combined.

IMG_0887

Apple Filling

*Note: I used two each Granny Smith, Macoun, Honeycrisp and Golden Delicious; each has a different sweetness or tartness and soft or firm texture, which makes a complex pie.

Peel and core the apples and cut into 1/2-inch slices lengthwise. Sprinkle with cinnamon and salt; toss to combine.

IMG_0863

Assembly

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Lightly flour a rolling surface, the rolling pin and both sides of the pastry dough. Roll the dough out from the middle; turn, roll from the middle. If the dough begins to stick, lift and lightly sprinkle more flour on the rolling surface, rolling pin and pastry dough. Continue rolling, turning and dusting as needed until the dough is roughly 14-inches round.

IMG_0817

Roll out the pie crust (see our post/video) around the rolling pin and drape evenly across the pie dish. Lift each side and tuck the pastry down the sides of the pie dish. Cut the edge of the dough around the pie dish leaving a one-inch overlap.

IMG_0826

Fold the overlap under and then crimp. Sprinkle the bottom of the pie dish with one tablespoon all-purpose flour.

IMG_0877

Slide the apple mixture into the dough-lined pie dish. Strew the crumble over the top.

IMG_0889

Bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes, then reduce the heat to 350ºF and continue cooking until the apples are fork tender and juices are bubbling, about 45 minutes; the pie is done when the apples are easily pierced with a knife.

IMG_0920

 

Print

Apple Pie with Crumb Topping

apple pie

Make this delicious apple pie with crumb topping with a variety of apples, such as McIntosh, Granny Smith, Golden Delicious or McCoun. Serve with whipped cream, ice cream or slices of Cheddar cheese.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 1 hour
  • Cook Time: 1 hour
  • Total Time: 2 hours
  • Yield: 8 servings
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

Pastry Dough
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter,
6-8 tablespoons cold water, divided
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Apple Filling
8 medium apples (use a variety for complex flavor)*
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon Kosher salt

Crumb Topping
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup walnuts
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup quick oats
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Instructions

Pastry Dough
Dump the flour, sugar, cinnamon and salt in a large bowl.

Cut the butter in half lengthwise and then into 8 slices. Toss these into the flour and coat the individual pieces well.

Cut the butter with a pastry blender until the butter is in tiny pieces about the size of a pea.

Use the butter wrapper to grease the inside of the pie dish.

Pour the vanilla into a measuring cup and add four ounces of cold water. Drizzle over the flour. Toss gently with your fingers to incorporate the moisture.

Form a small clump of dough. If it crumbles easily, add another tablespoon of cold water and toss.

Form another small clump and repeat the crumble test. Add another teaspoon or two of cold water and repeat the crumble test.

Once the dough holds together, it should not be wet, push it all together into a mound and place on a piece of plastic wrap.

Wrap securely and push down to form a round disc.

Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes to hydrate the flour.

Apple Filling
Peel and core the apples and cut into 1/2- to 3/4-inch slices lengthwise.

Sprinkle with cinnamon and salt; toss to combine.

Crumb Topping
Put the sugar and walnuts in the base of a food processor and pulse until the nuts are mealy.

Add the flour, oat, cinnamon and salt and pulse five-six times.

Dump the crumble mixture into a medium-sized mixing bowl.

Pour the melted butter onto the crumble mixture and stir until combined.

Assemble

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Lightly flour a rolling surface, the rolling pin and both sides of the pastry dough.

Roll the dough out from the middle; turn, roll from the middle. If the dough begins to stick, lift and lightly sprinkle more flour on the rolling surface, rolling pin and pastry dough.

Continue rolling, turning and dusting as needed until the dough is roughly 14-inches round.

Roll the dough around the rolling pin and drape evenly across the pie dish. Lift each side and tuck the pastry down the sides of the pie dish. Cut the edge of the dough around the pie dish leaving a one-inch overlap.

Slide the apple mixture into the dough-lined pie dish. Strew the crumble over the top.

Bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes, then reduce the heat to 350ºF and continue cooking until the apples are fork tender and juices are bubbling, about 45 minutes; the pie is done when the apples are easily pierced with a knife.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 51581

Keywords: apple pie, apple crumb pie, dessert, pie, crumble, apple dessert

 

Garlic Shrimp Bites with Pineapple Salsa

This recipe for Garlic Shrimp Bites with Pineapple Salsa is a light, easy-to-prepare appetizer. If you don’t have the ceramic spoons shown in the picture above, use taco or pita chips.

Most fishmongers clean and devein the shrimp for you. If possible, get them to remove the tail end, too. If not, just pinch until you hear a slight crack and gently wiggle it off. I prefer to use Wild USA shrimp.

Shelled and deveined shrimp.

If you don’t have a grill, heat a medium frypan over medium-high heat and sauté the marinated shrimp as directed below.

Cut the green onions on the diagonal and include the green tops, which add color and flavor.

Method

Combine the shrimp, oil, garlic, salt and pepper flakes in a non-reactive bowl and cover or a self-closing plastic bag, and chill for at least two hours.

Marinating shrimp.

Preheat the grill. Place the shrimp on the hot grill and cook for two minutes on one side, turn and cook another one or two minutes. The shrimp are ready when they are pink and firm.

Grilled shrimp.

Cut the shrimp into bite-size chunks and place one piece on each spoon or on each taco or pita chip and top with pineapple salsa. See our post on how to peel a pineapple.

Pineapple Salsa

Pineapple salsa.

1/2 fresh pineapple, minced
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
1/4 cup thinly sliced green onions (cut on diagonal green tips)
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
1 small jalapeno,
1 teaspoon Kosher salt

Chopped green onions.

Combine the pineapple, lime juice, green onions, cilantro, jalapeno, and salt. Let sit 30 minutes, stir once at 15 minutes. Can be made up to two days in advance.

Salsa ingredients.

 

Print

Grilled Garlic Shrimp

Most fishmongers clean and devein the shrimp for you. If possible, get them to remove the tail shell, too. If you don’t have a grill, heat a medium sauté pan over medium-high heat and sauté the marinated shrimp into the hot pan and cook as directed below.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 20
  • Cook Time: 6
  • Total Time: 26 minutes
  • Yield: 8 portions
  • Category: Appetizer
  • Method: Grilling

Ingredients

  • Pineapple Salsa
  • 1/2 cup minced fresh pineapple
    1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
    1/4 cup thinly sliced green onions (cut on diagonal green tips)
    1/4 cup chopped cilantro
    1 small jalapeño
    1 teaspoon Kosher salt
    Grilled Shrimp
  • one pound medium or large shrimp, shelled and deveined
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes, more if you dare!

Instructions

  1. Pineapple Salsa
  2. Combine the pineapple, lime juice, green onions, cilantro, jalapeno, and salt. Let sit 30 minutes, stir once at 15 minutes.
  3. Can be made up to two days in advance.
  4. Combine the shrimp, oil, garlic, salt and pepper flakes in a non-reactive bowl and cover or a self-closing plastic bag, and chill for at least two hours.
  5. Preheat the grill. Place the shrimp on the hot grill and cook for two minutes on one side, turn and cook another one or two minutes. The shrimp are ready when they are pink and firm.

 

How to Peel and Cut a Pineapple

Here’s a primer on How to Peel and Cut a Pineapple. A pineapple ripens from the stem end up. Look for one that has a golden color; the more golden top to bottom, the more even the flavor. The leaves on top should be green and firm and the pineapple should be firm, but yield slightly to a little pressure. The aroma coming from the base of the fruit should be sweet. If you detect a vinegary odor and/or the pineapple is very soft, it’s overripe.

Step-by-Step Instructions on How to Peel and Cut a Pineapple

DSCN2914

Place the pineapple on a cutting board on its side. Slice off the top and the bottom. Reserve the top to use as decoration on a fruit platter.

DSCN2916

Stand the pineapple up and slice down the sides with a sharp knife all the way around. Look at the first cut to make sure you’re slicing thick enough to remove the eyes. Remove remaining eyes with a paring knife.

DSCN2918

Slice the pineapple into quarters lengthwise and then remove the hard cord slicing straight down each quarter.

DSCN2921

To dice the pineapple, cut each quarter into thin slices lengthwise and cut the slices into thin strips.

DSCN2925

Turn and cut the strips into a dice.

DSCN2931

A whole pineapple makes about four cups diced pineapple.

DSCN2934

To cut bit-size pieces for a fruit platter, cut each quarter in half lengthwise and slice across.

DSCN2936

See our recipe for Grilled Shrimp Bites with Pineapple Salsa.

Blood Orange and Pink Grapefruit Juice

My new go to drink in the morning is Blood Orange and Pink Grapefruit Juice.

A friend’s son was selling grapefruit and oranges to raise money for a school project. I bought 20 lbs.  Then Mom brought grapefruit with her when she came for Christmas. I’ve enjoyed a freshly squeezed
glass of juice every morning for weeks now. Ran out of oranges and picked up some blood oranges – so pretty and delicious.

Quick and Easy to Make

Blood Orange and Pink Grapefruit Juice
Makes 8 ounces

1 small pink grapefruit
2 blood oranges

Cut each in half and juice.

Make sure when squeezing the juice that you get the pulp.

Grilled Pork Medallions with Fig Sauce

I love figs and pork. Walking through Stew Leonard’s the other day I saw a crate with 24 lovely purple figs. Along with the figs, I bought pork tenderloin and made Grilled Pork Medallions with Fig Sauce.

Method

Preheat the grill.

Remove the small tail. Cut the pork in half and each of the two pieces in half.

Stand each piece of pork cut side down on the board, cover the top with plastic wrap and using a meat mallet or heavy-bottomed pan, pound the meat to a one-inch thickness. Place on a tray.

If you want to use the tail, pound it on the uncut side to a one-inch thickness. Otherwise, freeze and save for another purpose, such as a stew or for grinding.

Season each medallion with salt and pepper on both sides.

Remove the tops from the figs and discard. Chop the four ripest figs in to small pieces. Slice eight figs into quarters.

Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat.

Stir in the onions and garlic and sweat for three minutes, or until the onions have softened.

Add the wine, bring to boil and cook for 3 minutes. Stir in the figs, chicken stock, sage, salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil then lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 15 minutes.

In the meantime, grill the pork over high heat for about 4 minutes per side, turning halfway through to get the grill marks.

Remove from the heat and let sit, lightly covered, on the serving platter for four minutes.

Sauce the medallions and serve or serve the sauce on the side.

Print

Grilled Pork Medallions with Fig Sauce

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 4 portions
  • Category: Pork
  • Method: Grilling

Ingredients

1 whole pork tenderloin
12 fresh figs
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 large shallot, minced
1 garlic clove, minced
1/2 cup dry red wine
1 cup chicken stock, preferably unsalted*
2 sprigs of fresh sage or 1/2 teaspoon dried sage
1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

Instructions

Preheat the grill.

Remove the small tail. Cut the pork in half and each of the two pieces in half.

Stand each piece of pork cut side down on the board, cover the top with plastic wrap and using a meat mallet or heavy-bottomed pan, pound the meat to a one-inch thickness. Place on a tray.

If you want to use the tail, pound it on the uncut side to a one-inch thickness. Otherwise, freeze and save for another purpose, such as a stew or for grinding.

Season each medallion with salt and pepper on both sides.

Remove the tops from the figs and discard. Chop the four ripest figs in to small pieces. Slice eight figs into quarters.

Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat.

Stir in the onions and garlic and sweat for three minutes, or until the onions have softened.

Add the wine, bring to boil and cook for 3 minutes. Stir in the figs, chicken stock, sage, salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil then lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 15 minutes.

 

In the meantime, grill the pork over high heat for about 4 minutes per side, turning halfway through to get the grill marks.

Remove from the heat and let sit, lightly covered, on the serving platter for four minutes.

Sauce the medallions and serve or serve the sauce on the side.

Notes

Reduce the amount of salt added if using a salted stock.

Applesauce

 It’s always fun when your children come home for a visit and it’s especially fun for us when they bring along a bunch of  hungry friends; especially when they have no food restrictions/requirements. They were in for a surprise as I was experimenting with turkey meatloaf. It was okay, not spectacular. My
applesauce on the other hand is a proven success for many years.
 Applesauce is one of the easiest recipes to make and one I taught every semester in the first week of our food lab at NYU. I hope none of my students ever purchased jarred applesauce again!
Purchase a mix of at least 3 varieties, such as tart Granny Smith, sweet McIntosh and Golden Delicious with its honey-like overtones. There are two methods for making applesauce. The first is good for a small batch, the second for large batches.
applesauce
Peeled and Cored Method
Peel, core and cut the apples into chunks – the smaller the pieces the faster they cook down.
applesauce

Pop these into a covered sauce pan with 1/4 cup cold water. Turn the heat on low and stir occasionally  Once the apples begin to break down turn the heat up a little. The apples are ready when easily crushed against the side of the pan with the back of a wooden spoon or spatula. Mash and season with ground cinnamon.

applesauce

Unpeeled Method
Wash the apples and cut into chunks – the smaller the pieces the faster they cook down.  Pop these into a covered sauce pan with 1/4 cup cold water. Turn the heat on low and stir occasionally. Once the apples begin to break down turn the heat up a little. The apples are ready when easily crushed against the side of the pan with the back of a wooden spoon or spatula.
Ladle small batches into a food mill placed over a large bowl or saucepan and process to remove skins, core and seeds. Scrape the food mill clean between batches. Season with ground cinnamon.
Applesauce is best served warm, nuke in the microwave for 30 seconds, stir and nuke again.
Freezes well.


Print

Applesauce

applesauce

Use a variety of apples, such as Granny Smith, McIntosh and Golden Delicious, for a complex tasting applesauce.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 2 cups
  • Category: Fruit

Ingredients

9 apples
1/4 cup cold water
ground cinnamon, to taste

Instructions

Peeled and Cored Method

Peel, core and cut into chunks – the smaller the pieces the faster they cook down.

Pop these into a covered sauce pan with 1/4 cup cold water. Turn the heat on low and stir occasionally. Once the apples begin to break down turn the heat up a little. The apples are ready when easily crushed against the side of the pan with the back of a wooden spoon or spatula. Mash and season with ground cinnamon.

Unpeeled Method

Wash the apples and cut into chunks – the smaller the pieces the faster they cook down.  Pop these into a covered sauce pan with 1/4 cup cold water. Turn the heat on low and stir occasionally. Once the apples begin to break down turn the heat up a little. The apples are ready when easily crushed against the side of the pan with the back of a wooden spoon or spatula.

Ladle small batches into a food mill placed over a large bowl or saucepan and process to remove skins, core and seeds. Scrape the food mill clean between batches. Season with ground cinnamon.

Notes

Applesauce is best served warm, nuke in the microwave for 30 seconds, stir and nuke again.

Freezes well.