Tag: Eggs

Cinnamon Raisin French Toast

French Toast and strawberry compote

French Toast and strawberry compoteFrench toast is a weekend event. Not that it’s difficult to make, but a little time consuming for a busy workday morning. I love this recipe for Cinnamon Raisin French Toast. Saturate the bread slices in an egg mixture for several minutes, which creates a custardy center and crisp out layer. A pat of butter on top and a drizzle of warm maple syrup and you have perfect cinnamon raisin French toast!

Beat the eggs, cream and vanilla in a small bowl.

Lay the bread on a baking sheet and pour the egg mixture over the top. Let sit for 3 minutes.

French Toast

Turn and let sit for 3 minutes more.

Melt the butter in the skillet or griddle over medium-high heat. Lay the bread slices on the hot griddle and cook until golden brown, turn and cook until golden brown. Adjust heat as needed.

French Toast

Hold in a 200 degree F oven until all the toast is cooked.

Microwave bacon to serve with the French toast.

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Cinnamon Raisin French Toast

French Toast and strawberry compote
  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 25 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings
  • Category: Breakfast/Brunch

Ingredients

4 large eggs
¼ cup heavy cream or half and half
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
8 slices cinnamon raisin bread
2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Garnish
butter and warm maple syrup

Instructions

Beat the eggs, cream and vanilla in a small bowl.

Lay the bread on a baking and pour the egg mixture over the top. Let sit for 3 minutes.

Turn and let sit for 3 minutes more.

Melt the butter in the skillet on griddle over medium-high heat. Lay the bread slices on the hot griddle and cook until golden brown, turn and cook until golden brown. Adjust heat as needed.

Hold in a 200 degree F oven, until all the toast is cooked.

Cheddar Cheese and Bacon Deviled Eggs

Deviled Eggs

Easter means an abundance of hard-boiled eggs. What do you do with them when the holiday is over? How about deviled eggs. Here’s a delicious recipe for Cheddar Cheese and Bacon Deviled Eggs, sure to please everyone.

Deviled Eggs

Deviled eggs aren’t just for parties, they make a great breakfast, especially these, similar to an omelette or a typical bacon and egg dish. Prepare the eggs in advance and pack a few for your coffee break at the office or in the kids’ lunches.

Another use for deviled eggs is to chop up the egg whites and fold into the deviled egg mix for a delicious egg salad. Add another tablespoon or two of mayonnaise or yogurt to loosen up.

Deviled Eggs

Don’t have a lot of time? Purchase pre-cooked and shelled hard-boiled eggs and this recipe comes together in minutes.

Watch the Cheddar Bacon Deviled Egg video here.
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Cheddar Cheese and Bacon Deviled Eggs

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 40 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 12
  • Category: Eggs

Ingredients

1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 small shallot minced
¼ teaspoon coarse salt
6 hard-cooked eggs, shelled and sliced in half lengthwise, yolks and whites separated
3 strips cooked bacon, divided
¼ cup shredded Cheddar cheese
¼ cup mayonnaise
Generous dashes of hot sauce, such as Frank’s or Tabasco

Garnish
Bacon bits

Instructions

Melt the butter in a small skillet over medium heat.

Stir in shallots and salt; sweat for 4 minutes or until the shallots are soft.

Place the yolks, 2 bacon strips, Cheddar cheese, mayonnaise and hot sauce in the base of a food processor. Purée, scraping sides as needed. Add the cooked shallots and purée again.

Fill the cavity of each egg white with the egg yolk purée by using a spoon or a piping bag.

Garnish each egg with the bacon bits.

Cover and store in the refrigerator for up to 4 days. Best served at room temperature.

Notes

The bacon is used in two different steps; two strips are used in the recipe and one for a garnish.

Cooking Sunny-Side Up Eggs

sunny-side up eggs

I love a sunny-side up egg. The problem is that not many people cook them right. I want a sunshine yellow runny egg yolk, but I don’t want uncooked egg white on the top. Here’s my secret to cooking sunny-side up eggs!

My secret is to use an ice cube! It keeps the yolk high and prominent, perfectly runny and the egg whites cooked through.

Put a generous dollop of butter in a skillet over medium heat to melt. Once the butter foams, crack your egg(s) into the hot skillet and lower the heat a tad.

sunny-side up eggs

Pop an ice cube into the skillet.

sunny-side up eggs

Cover with a convex cover – like the one below.

sunny-side up eggs

The cover is going to jiggle and the butter sputter a little from the steam of the melting ice cube.

Remove the cover and you have a beautiful sunny-side-up egg!

sunny-side up eggs

Watch the How to Cook a Sunny-Side Up Egg video here.
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Cooking Sunny-Side Up Eggs

Use our fool-proof method to cook the perfect sunny-side up egg – an ice cube!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 2 minutes
  • Total Time: 12 minutes
  • Yield: 1 serving
  • Category: Eggs
  • Method: Frying

Ingredients

1 tablespoon unsalted butter
2 large eggs
kosher salt
black pepper

Instructions

Melt the butter in a small skillet over medium heat.

Once the butter foams, drop 2 eggs into the skillet and add 1 ice cube.

Use a convex lid to cover the pan and cook for 60 – 90 seconds.

Slide the eggs onto a warm plate.

 

Scrambled Eggs

Scrambled Eggs with and without dairy

I googled for recipes of scrambled eggs with dairy and without. It was interesting to see how each method has die-hard fans. Does it make a difference if you use dairy nor not?

The water content of the egg white evaporates during cooking. Adding milk, especially whole or 2-percent milk, has added fat and water to keep the eggs moist.

Scrambled Eggs with and without dairy

Lack of dairy produces a scrambled egg that is a little drier and less fluffy, but with more of an eggy taste.

The difference is negligible, though. You decide what’s right for you.

See our post for an in-depth explanation on how to cook protein, which explains why we recommend cooking low and slow.

Scrambled Eggs with and without dairy

Beat the eggs well and season with salt and pepper before cooking for optimum flavor. A non-stick skillet requires less fat than a regular skilled. I prefer butter for the sweet taste it imparts, but you can easily substitute coconut oil or vegetable oil.

Watch the Scrambled Eggs without Dairy video here.

Adding a little milk or cream to your scrambled eggs makes lighter fluffier eggs. A tablespoon or two for 2 or 3 eggs is sufficient, substitute soy, almond or coconut milk, if desired. Final flavor varies.

Watch the Scrambled Eggs with Dairy video here.

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Scrambled Eggs

Scrambled Eggs with and without dairy

Scrambled eggs are delicious for any meal. For lunch place in a pita or wrap with some bacon and sliced tomatoes.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 3 minutes
  • Total Time: 8 minutes
  • Yield: 1 portion
  • Category: Eggs

Ingredients

2 large eggs
1 1/2  tablespoons milk or cream
pinch of salt
pinch of black pepper
2 teaspoons butter or oil

Instructions

Beat the eggs, dairy, salt, and pepper in a medium bowl until frothy.

Heat the butter over medium heat in a skillet.

Once the butter is frothy, pour in the scrambled eggs and gently and continuously stir to create curds.

The eggs are done when all liquid disappears and the eggs are yellow and fluffy.

Notes

Substitute soy, almond or coconut milks for cow’s milk.

 

Bacon Spinach Quiche

Quiche

Quiche is simply an omelet in a pre-baked pie shell. It makes for a different presentation than what we usually eat for breakfast and you don’t have to make toast, the crust is a delicious alternative. See our post video on how to blind bake a pie crust.

NOTE: Since taping this video, I now prefer to completely blind bake the crust and not partially as suggested in the video.

Watch the Quiche Video Here:

Quiche is also a wonderful way to use leftovers. Dice up the remains from a charcuterie platter, sharp cheese, salty spicy salami, dice some onions and garlic add in some fresh herbs and you have an improvised quiche. Leftover steamed or roasted vegetables are also great starters for quiche.

Quiche

Use your imagination when you go to the store; look at the fresh produce and select what strikes your fancy and don’t forget some fresh herbs. Pick a cheese, almost any cheese works, that pairs well with your produce or suits your mood that day. The possibilities are endless.

Quiche

Quiche is delicious served hot out of the oven, but it’s also great at room temperature and it travels well. Pack it for lunch for the kids or for yourself at work.

Quiche

Watch the Quiche Video Here
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Bacon Spinach Quiche

quiche

A quiche is simply an omelet in a pastry shell. The possibilities for fillings are endless. Use leftovers or your imagination to create an unending variety!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 1 hour
  • Cook Time: 40 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hour 40 mins
  • Yield: 1 ten-inch pie
  • Category: Eggs
  • Method: Baking

Ingredients

  • One single pie crust
  • 6 large eggs (1 cup)
  • 2 cups half and half
  • 1 teaspoons coarse salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1 ¼ cups diced Gruyere cheese (1/4-inch dice)
  • 1 10-ounce package frozen spinach, squeezed dry
  • ½ cup finely diced cooked bacon, about 5 ounces
  • ½ cup minced shallot

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Place the eggs in a medium mixing bowl and whisk until foamy.
  3. Whisk in the half and half, salt and pepper.
  4. Strew the cheese, spinach, bacon and shallots over the bottom of a half blind-baked pie shell.
  5. Pour the egg mixture over all. And put on a foil line baking tray.
  6. Bake for 30 minutes or until the custard is set.
  7. Let sit for 10 minutes for slicing.

Notes

Line a baking tray with foil or parchment and place the quiche on this for baking. If the quiche leaks, the baking tray contains the mess and keeps your oven clean.

The quiche needs to rest before slicing to allow the eggs to finish gelling.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 8 portions

Hard Boiled Egg

eggs

The key to a successful hard boiled egg is gentle heat and slow cooking. By using this method, the egg is moist and tender with no off odor and a perfectly yellow egg yolk.

Overexposure to high heat releases sulfur from the egg white and iron from the yolk, which results in that unpleasant odor and gray-green coloration on the outer yolk.

Place eggs in a pan large enough to hold the eggs so they are covered by two inches of cold water. Bring to a boil, turn off the heat, cover and let sit for 12 minutes.

Plunge the eggs into an ice bath and let cool completely.

Crack and peel for delicate and delicious hard boiled eggs!

Here’s a recipe for Curried Devil Eggs.

Baked Cheddar Cheese and Ham Omelet

Back to School Dinner Recipe

Mornings are hectic and it’s unlikely that a home-cooked robust breakfast is appearing on the table. Everyone is in hurry to grab a bite and catch the bus or head off to work. This is a very good time to have breakfast for dinner with a Baked Cheddar Cheese and Ham Omelet.

Eggs are nutritious and versatile. You can prepare them simply by frying, scrambling or poaching. Serve with toast and ham or sausage on the side and some steamed vegetables. Simple, quick and easy.

Back to School Dinner Recipe

You can also make heartier preparations like baked omelets. I recommend cooking extra vegetables on the weekend, cut them up and put in a container. Buy a slice of ham and dice it up and save in a container or pre-cook some sausages, dice up and save in a container. Sauté a diced onion and save in a container. Having roasted root vegetables this weekend? Save the leftovers in a container.

Back to School Dinner Recipe

Don’t have leftovers? No worries. Take advantage of the pre-cut vegetables most grocery stores offer these days: thinly sliced bell peppers, little buds of broccoli or cauliflower. Buy a zucchini or some green beans and cut into bite-size pieces. Best of all, there is no need to precook these vegetables. Pick up a package of your favorite shredded cheese and you can prep dinner in 20 minutes or less.

Back to School Dinner Recipe

What to serve on the side: toasted English muffins, a nice crusty bread, muffins or scones; you don’t have to bake, pick them up with your morning coffee!

Warm the bread, muffins or scones in the oven after you remove the omelet, which needs to sit a good 10 minutes to set before slicing. A nice green salad or a side of steamed vegetables rounds out this meal nicely.

Back to School Dinner Recipe

While the omelet bakes you can set the table, or perhaps the kids can do that when they get home from school, check on homework status, get into some comfortable after-work clothes and maybe even have a glass of wine!

You’ve made a delicious, nutritious meal in a very short time with very little cleanup after and it’s economical. If you have any leftovers, send it the lunchbox.

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Baked Cheddar Cheese and Ham Omelet

Back to School Dinner Recipe

Mornings are hectic and it’s unlikely that a home-cooked robust breakfast is appearing on the table. Everyone is in hurry to grab a bite and catch the bus or head off to work. This is a very good time to have breakfast for dinner with a Baked Cheddar Cheese and Ham Omelet.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 20 mins
  • Cook Time: 45 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hour 5 mins
  • Yield: 6 portions
  • Category: Eggs
  • Method: Baking

Ingredients

  • one dozen large eggs
  • 1/4 cup half and half
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup small pieces broccoli florets
  • 1 cup small pieces cauliflower florets
  • 1 cup diced ham

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F and lightly grease an 8- by 8- by 2-inch cake/brownie pan.
  2. Beat the eggs, half and half, salt and pepper until frothy.
  3. Scatter the fillings across the bottom of the pan and cover with the scrambled eggs.
  4. Bake in the preheated oven for 45 minutes. The omelet is done when puffed, solid in the middle and a little golden on the edges. Let sit 15 minutes before slicing.

Notes

Send leftovers in the lunch box tomorrow.

 

Roasted Vegetable and Ham Frittata

What do you do with leftovers? Repurpose them into a Roasted Vegetable and Ham Frittata.

We had leftover roasted vegetables from dinner and leftover ham from the split pea soup I recently made. I tossed the vegetables and ham together and put them in the bottom of a buttered deep-dish pie pan. It took nine well-beaten eggs with to cover this. I didn’t add any salt and pepper to the eggs because the vegetables were well seasoned and the ham salty. It was the right decision, adding any more salt would have been too much.

We had the frittata for dinner with enough leftover for lunch the next day.

Place the vegetables and ham in the bottom of a lightly greased deep-dish pie pan.

IMG_3658

Beat the eggs and dairy until frothy. Pour over the vegetables.

IMG_3661

Bake for one and one-quarter hours or until the frittata is completely set. Test with the blade of a knife. The frittata is done when the knife comes out clean.

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Roasted Vegetable and Ham Frittata

The vegetables I used were well seasoned and I opted not to season the frittata. Be sure to taste your leftovers before seasoning.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 85 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Yield: 6 portions
  • Category: Eggs

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Leftover vegetables
    4 ounces ham, cut into small cubes
    9 large eggs
    1/4 cup milk or half and half
    Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 325ºF.
  2. Place the vegetables and ham in the bottom of a lightly greased deep-dish pie pan.
  3. Beat the eggs and milk until frothy.
  4. Pour over the vegetables.
  5. Bake for one and one-quarter hours or until the frittata is completely set.
  6. Test with the blade of a knife. The frittata is done when the knife comes out clean.
  7. Let sit for 10 minutes to solidify.

 

How to Cook Protein

How to cook protein to a particular doneness and maintain moisture is an essential technique to master. But first you need to understand what happens when you manipulate protein in order to control the process.

Composition

Protein is made up of, among other things, 21 amino acids. These amino acids are grouped together in a variety of ways. Some are attracted to each other and some are not. It is the composition of and the attraction of these amino acids that affect the outcome of cooked proteins: meat, fish, poultry and eggs.

To demonstrate what happens to protein bonds, I’m using a beaded necklace in the photos. Each bead represents an amino acid. The bonds are looped together in a particular way when proteins are raw, whole, or never frozen. Keep in mind this is all microscopic and three-dimensional.

Loops are formed by amino acids that are attracted to each other and held captive inside each loop is bound water; it cannot escape until something happens to loosen the grip, such as cutting, chopping, grinding, pounding, cooking, freezing, brining, or marinating. Water is bound to amino acids on the outside loops as well. This is the liquid that leaks out, which is why raw meat is moist on top and liquid pools on the bottom of the package.

how to cook protein

How to Cook Protein

One of the ways we change protein at home is by cooking. Cooking  changes texture, color, moisture, and appearance. It doesn’t matter what cooking method is used, the same thing happens each time, only the speed of the change will vary and that depends on temperature.

Most cooking methods require high heat initially. We want to sear and create a crust or we want to stew and infuse flavor. But once high heat is achieved, temperature control is very important. Those bonds inside begin to change as a protein heats up. They denature or relax and unwind. Juices are free to escape, the appearance may change from translucent to opaque (egg whites), and texture firms. How much moisture you lose and how firm the meat becomes is dependent on temperature control and desired degree of doneness, rare, medium, well done.

how to cook protein

For rare to medium rare, the bonds will never completely unwind, preserving moisture and tenderness, with a lesser-cooked center; very rare meat is blue/red and has a cool center, medium rare has a pink-red warm center. Medium requires more cooking and a barely pink and hot center. It has less moisture and the meat is firmer – a result of the lost moisture and the tightening of protein bonds. Well done will have a completely colorless (grey/beige) hot center, very little moisture and is very firm and chewy.

As a protein coagulates, begins to recoil, those loops reform binding water inside and out. How much heat, how quickly and how long that heat was applied affects the tightness of the reformed loops. This determines moistness and tenderness.

how to cook protein

Resting

All meat should sit off heat after cooking. The residual heat continues to cook the meat and protein bonds coagulate or reform. Cutting immediately releases those juices that would otherwise be bound within. In the rare to medium rare meat, the cooling time may only be a minute or two and most of the reaction occurs on the outer edges. Anything cooked to medium will have a higher residual heat and cook for 3-4 minutes more. The well-done piece continues to cook for up to 5 or more minutes, depending on size and density. Waiting before cutting allows the bonds to reform and retain whatever moisture is left within the meat. This process is called resting.

Well Done Meat

Is it possible to have well-done meat and still have moisture? Yes. It requires proper temperature control. The initial high heat used to sear the outer crust can be lowered significantly to cook meat slowly for a longer time. This slows the unwinding process, but still allows the heat to penetrate throughout. If you continue to cook at high temperatures, the process of unwinding and reforming happens quickly; the resulting coagulation is very tight, which equals very little moisture and tough texture. A well-done piece of meat will never be as juicy as lesser-cooked meat, but with care, you can retain moisture.

Demonstration

Below are pictures of cooked eggs. Two fried eggs and two scrambled eggs. For this demonstration, I cooked the eggs for the same amount of time, in a preheated pan, with a light spray of cooking oil. The only difference was the temperature used.

how to cook protein

The eggs were both flipped at 2 minutes and removed from the pan after an additional minute. Notice the difference in color and texture. The one on the right was cooked on high. It has crispy edges (protein with no moisture left). I heard the water (egg whites are about 80% water) sizzling and the egg white jumped in the pan as the water instantly reached boiling point.

Thesescrambled eggs were each cooked for a minute and a half. The one pictured below, cooked over low heat, is plump and moist.

This egg, cooked over high heat, broke into pieces, has browned edges, and firmer texture and less moisture.

how to cook protein

Shown together.

how to cook protein

For more information on how heat affects moisture and texture, see our post on how to cook meat.