Tag: Clams

Seafood en Papillote

Cooking en papillote is fun to make and intense flavors are easy to create because of the cooking method. I chose to use a mixture of cod, shrimp, and scallops for this Seafood en Papillote recipe.

En papillote simply means cooking “in parchment” in French. The Italians call it al cartoccio. Essentially, these are little packets of tender proteins with thinly sliced aromatics, herbs, spices and/or vegetables with a drizzle of acid, such as citrus or wine, a dollop of butter, and a sprinkle of salt and pepper, and tightly wrapped. The cooking method is a combination of baking and steaming. The enclosed package keeps the steam in, cooks quickly, infuses flavor, and keeps food moist.

The most important thing is to create a tight seal, so the bag puffs up. Using parchment paper can be a little tricky and aluminum foil is virtually fool-proof. The parchment paper, however, makes a more glamorous presentation – slightly charred paper that pierces easily releasing the aromas under the nose of the diner.

Folding the Parchment Packets

4 half-sheet parchment sheets (16 ½” x 12 ¼”)
Scissors
Large baking tray

Fold the parchment in half and trim to a 15″ x 12″ rectangle. Draw a half heart shape on each and cut with scissors.

en papillote

Open and lay the ingredients in the center, fold the paper over and crimp.

Crimping the Packet

en papillote

Start at the top of the packet and fold ½-inch over and crease well. Continue making ½-inch folds with a firm crease until you reach the bottom point. Crimp and tuck final pleat under the packet.

en papillote

The key to success is a tightly sealed packet to contain the steam.

Aluminum Foil Packets

Use either regular or heavy-duty foil that’s 20 inches wide. Pull 4 sheets that are 20 inches long.

Fold in half, open and place the food in the center of one side.

en papillote

Fold over and square off the side by folding the edge. Turn and fold each end, pressing hard to seal tightly.

en papillote

The advantages of foil is the ease of creating a secure seal and if you open the packet and the food isn’t cooked through, it reseals easily.

Watch the Seafood en Papillote video here.
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Seafood en Papillote

Cooking en papillote is fun to make and intense flavors are easy to create because of the cooking method. This Seafood en Papillote recipe uses halibut fillet, sea scallops, shrimp, and cherrystone clams.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 45 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 4 servings
  • Category: Seafood
  • Method: Baking/Steaming

Ingredients

¼ cup white wine
¼ cup clam juice or fish stock
¼ cup minced shallots (2 small shallots)
1 tablespoon minced cloves garlic (3 medium cloves)
1 teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper flakes
8  thin slices of fresh lemon
4  three- to four-ounce skinned white fish fillets, such as halibut or cod
8 cherrystone clams, thoroughly washed
8 jumbo shrimp, peeled and deveined
8 sea scallops, cleaned
8 fresh thyme sprigs
8 cherry tomatoes, halved
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into four pieces

Instructions

Parchment paper or foil wrappers.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Combine the wine, clam juice or fish stock, shallots, garlic, salt, and pepper flakes in a covered container.

Place 2 slices of lemon centered near the midsection of each wrapper.

Set one fish filet on each of the lemons, set 2 clams, 2 shrimp, and 2 scallops, and 2 cherry tomatoes around the fish. Top with 2 thyme sprigs.

Shake the wine sauce to combine and pour a quarter over each fish and top with a one piece of the butter.

Crimp each packet and cook in the preheated oven for 15 minutes.

Serve in the package and let each dinner open. The aromatic steam is part of the experience.

Notes

Folding the Parchment Packets

4 half-sheet parchment sheets (16 ½” x 12 ¼”)
Scissors
Large baking tray

Fold the parchment in half and trim to a 15″ x 12″ rectangle. Draw a half heart shape on each and cut with scissors.

Open and lay the ingredients in the center, fold the paper over and crimp.

Crimping the Packet

Start at the top of the packet and fold ½-inch over and crease well. Continue making ½-inch folds with a firm crease until you reach the bottom point. Crimp and tuck final pleat under the packet.

The key to success is a tightly sealed packet to contain the steam.

Aluminum Foil Packets

Use either regular or heavy-duty foil that’s 20 inches wide. Pull 4 sheets that are 20 inches long.

Fold in half, open and place the food in the center of one side. Fold over and square off the side by folding the edge. Turn and fold each end, pressing hard to seal tightly.

The advantages of foil is the ease of creating a secure seal and if you open the packet and the food isn’t cooked through, it reseals easily.

Linguine with White Clam Sauce

Linguine with White Clam Sauce and Bacon

I frequently dine alone on weeknights as my husband’s work schedule is a little crazy. He was in Washington for a few days last week and again this week. Oftentimes, I don’t think much about what I’m going to eat. I clearly won’t starve, the pantry, refrigerator and freezer hold ample supplies that allow for a quick meal for one, such as Linguine with White Clam Sauce.

Linguine with white clam Sauce is one of my favorite pasta dishes and not one Eric cares for. When he’s out of town, it’s a golden opportunity to treat myself! By the time I think of making this, it’s too late to do the whole fresh clam thing, so I keep little 6.5 ounce cans of clams on hand. At 6pm when I begin to wonder what’s for dinner, I can cook up a single serving in the amount of time it takes to boil a few ounces of pasta. It’s quick, easy and very satisfying.

One night it occurred to me that clams and bacon go together in such a delicious way, why not chop up a little bacon, crisp it up and use it with he clams. Now I have two versions of this Linguine with white clam sauce!

Linguine with White Clam Sauce and Bacon

Putting it all Together

Gather and prep your ingredients while a large pot of salted water comes to a boil.

Put the pasta in the boiling water, stir and don’t forget to set your time for about 2 minutes less than recommended. The pasta finishes cooking in the skillet with the sauce.

Start the Bacon in a Cold Skillet

Place the bacon in a cold medium skillet over medium heat. Starting with a cold pan keeps the bacon from sticking and burning. Cook and stir until crispy. Remove and place the bacon bits in a small bowl. Skip this step if you don’t want bacon, but it’s really, really good!

Linguine with White Clam Sauce and Bacon

Add enough olive oil to the hot skillet with the bacon fat to make about 2 tablespoons of fat. Add the shallot, garlic, salt and pepper flakes. If you don’t want the heat from the pepper flakes, use freshly ground pepper instead. Cook and stir until soft and translucent, about 4 minutes. Turn down the heat if the garlic is browning too quickly.

Add the clam juice only and bring to a boil, let simmer for 30 seconds. Stir in the lemon juice and parsley.

Linguine with White Clam Sauce and Bacon

Drain the pasta, reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, and add the pasta and the  bacon bits to the sauce with the clams; toss to combine. Cook until the pasta is al dente, a little firm, not hard, to the bite. The pasta soaks up the sauce, add a little of the reserved cooking liquid if needed.

Garnish with the grated Parmesan cheese.

 

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Linguine with White Clam Sauce

Linguine with White Clam Sauce and Bacon

Keep pasta and canned clams on hand for a quick and easy single serving of Linguine with White Clam Sauce. For a little variety add bacon!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 12 minutes
  • Total Time: 22 minutes
  • Yield: 1 serving
  • Category: Pasta

Ingredients

  • 3-4 ounces dry linguine, cooked according to the package instructions, reserve ½ cup cooking liquid
  • 1 -2 slices smoky bacon, diced
  • 1-2 tablespoons olive oil, depends on how much bacon fat is left in the pan
  • 1 small shallot, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • ½ teaspoon coarse salt
  • ¼ – ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
  • 1 can (6.5 ounces) clams with juice
  • 1 ½ tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • Garnish
  • 1 tablespoon freshly chopped parsley
  • Freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions

  1. Gather and prep your ingredients while a large pot of salted water comes to a boil.
  2. Put the pasta in the boiling water, stir and don’t forget to set your time for about 2 minutes less than recommended. The pasta finishes cooking in the skillet with the sauce.
  3. Place the bacon in a cold medium skillet over medium heat. Starting with a cold pan keeps the bacon from sticking and burning. Cook and stir until crispy. Remove and place the bacon bits in a small bowl.
  4. Add enough olive oil to the hot skillet to make 2 tablespoons with the bacon fat.
  5.  Add the shallot, garlic, salt and pepper flakes. If you don’t want the heat from the pepper flakes, use freshly ground pepper instead.
  6. Cook and stir until soft and translucent, about 4 minutes. Turn down the heat if the garlic is browning too quickly.
  7. Add the clam juice only and bring to a boil, let simmer for 30 seconds. Stir in the lemon juice.
  8. Drain the pasta, reserving ½ cup of the cooking water, and add it along with the bacon bits and clams to the sauce; toss to combine. Add a little reserved cooking liquid if the sauce is dry.
  9. Garnish with the parsley and Parmesan cheese.