Category: Paleo

Grilled Vegetables

Do you get carried away by the beautiful produce at the farmers’ market? It happens to me all time. From one stand to the next there are more and more tantalizing vegetables. Fear not, you can toss them all on the grill and make a medley of Grilled Vegetables!

Grilled vegetables are a wonderful side for any meal or a meal in and of themselves. The leftovers make great wrap sandwiches the next day or dice them for a salad.

grilled vegetables on grill, zucchini, red onions, eggplant and corn

Cooking times vary depending on the whether the vegetable is cooked whole or sliced. I like my eggplant cooked well. I don’t find the taste of undercooked eggplant or its spongy texture appealing. However, a well-cooked, silken eggplant is perfection.

Corn takes a couple minutes per side, so 6 – 8 minutes. Cook over high heat for charred corn, which also makes a wonderful chowder. To cook gently, place it on the indirect heat side and cook for the same amount of time.

Scallions cook quickly and char easily – keep an eye on them, but it’s well worth grilling them for the sweetness they exude right off the grill.

To cook zucchini and summer squash I remove them while they have a little firmness. They contain lots of water and can turn to mush easily. A little texture in the bite is nice.

To grill, simply drizzle with olive oil and good sprinkle of salt and pepper. Additional dressings or herbs can be added after cooking.

Grill up some thick, bone-in pork chops to go along with your grilled vegetables!

Let yourself be tempted – bring those veggies home and grill them up!

Watch our video on How to Grill Vegetables here.

Grilled Boneless Chicken Thighs

grilled boneless chicken thigh sandwich with chips

The meat on a boneless, skinless chicken thigh is thin and cooking time is quick, yet the thigh still retains some fat and remains moist and flavorful. Season grilled boneless chicken thighs with salt, pepper and a drizzle of olive oil – simple and delicious.

Or, marinate with a store-bought or home-made marinade and try to marinate for at least 4 hours for better flavor. There are a bazillion (ok, maybe not that many, but a lot) of dry rubs, which don’t need more that 15 minutes sitting time, that pack in lots of flavor.

Boneless Chicken Thighs on the Grill

Make some grilled corn on the cob, too!

I love grilled boneless chicken thighs in sandwiches. Choose a nice bun or good bread and use your favorite condiment(s), pile on the lettuce and tomatoes and a few slices of dill pickle. The perfect sandwich!

grilled boneless chicken thigh sandwich

Watch the Grilled Boneless Chicken Thighs video here.

Tune in to Honeypie’s Recipes YouTube Channel to view the Grilled Chicken Mini Series playlist!

Microwave Bacon

Cooing bacon in the microwave.

As much as I love bacon, it’s a messy business to cook up a batch. My preferred method is to cook Microwave Bacon using a microwavable bacon plate.

Cooing bacon in the microwave.

I’ve had mine a long, long time. I looked them up on Amazon and found better designed models than my round one. Why round??? They even come with tops to prevent spattering; I use paper towel. I also line the bottom with paper towel for safety reasons. The ridges do keep the bacon grease away from the bacon, but if you’re cooking up several strips, that’s a lot of fat, the plate is hot, and the grease is slopping around in the bottom – very easy to get burned. The paper towel soaks up that grease and prevents dripping.

Cooing bacon in the microwave.

Place a paper towel over the top to prevent spattering.

Crispy bacon or floppy bacon – which camp are you in?

The crew at Honeypie’s Recipes like floppy bacon, however my family members like crispy, really crispy bacon. The only thing needed to make crispy bacon is more time. You can easily make both floppy and crispy by removing some bacon earlier and holding in a warm oven (200 degrees F) on a platter or in a warming drawer.

Serve the bacon with our delicious recipe for Cinnamon Raisin French Toast.

Cooing bacon in the microwave.

Watch the How to Cook Microwave Bacon Video here.

 

Seafood en Papillote

Cooking en papillote is fun to make and intense flavors are easy to create because of the cooking method. I chose to use a mixture of cod, shrimp, and scallops for this Seafood en Papillote recipe.

En papillote simply means cooking “in parchment” in French. The Italians call it al cartoccio. Essentially, these are little packets of tender proteins with thinly sliced aromatics, herbs, spices and/or vegetables with a drizzle of acid, such as citrus or wine, a dollop of butter, and a sprinkle of salt and pepper, and tightly wrapped. The cooking method is a combination of baking and steaming. The enclosed package keeps the steam in, cooks quickly, infuses flavor, and keeps food moist.

The most important thing is to create a tight seal, so the bag puffs up. Using parchment paper can be a little tricky and aluminum foil is virtually fool-proof. The parchment paper, however, makes a more glamorous presentation – slightly charred paper that pierces easily releasing the aromas under the nose of the diner.

Folding the Parchment Packets

4 half-sheet parchment sheets (16 ½” x 12 ¼”)
Scissors
Large baking tray

Fold the parchment in half and trim to a 15″ x 12″ rectangle. Draw a half heart shape on each and cut with scissors.

en papillote

Open and lay the ingredients in the center, fold the paper over and crimp.

Crimping the Packet

en papillote

Start at the top of the packet and fold ½-inch over and crease well. Continue making ½-inch folds with a firm crease until you reach the bottom point. Crimp and tuck final pleat under the packet.

en papillote

The key to success is a tightly sealed packet to contain the steam.

Aluminum Foil Packets

Use either regular or heavy-duty foil that’s 20 inches wide. Pull 4 sheets that are 20 inches long.

Fold in half, open and place the food in the center of one side.

en papillote

Fold over and square off the side by folding the edge. Turn and fold each end, pressing hard to seal tightly.

en papillote

The advantages of foil is the ease of creating a secure seal and if you open the packet and the food isn’t cooked through, it reseals easily.

Watch the Seafood en Papillote video here.
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Seafood en Papillote

Cooking en papillote is fun to make and intense flavors are easy to create because of the cooking method. This Seafood en Papillote recipe uses halibut fillet, sea scallops, shrimp, and cherrystone clams.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 45 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 4 servings
  • Category: Seafood
  • Method: Baking/Steaming

Ingredients

¼ cup white wine
¼ cup clam juice or fish stock
¼ cup minced shallots (2 small shallots)
1 tablespoon minced cloves garlic (3 medium cloves)
1 teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper flakes
8  thin slices of fresh lemon
4  three- to four-ounce skinned white fish fillets, such as halibut or cod
8 cherrystone clams, thoroughly washed
8 jumbo shrimp, peeled and deveined
8 sea scallops, cleaned
8 fresh thyme sprigs
8 cherry tomatoes, halved
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into four pieces

Instructions

Parchment paper or foil wrappers.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Combine the wine, clam juice or fish stock, shallots, garlic, salt, and pepper flakes in a covered container.

Place 2 slices of lemon centered near the midsection of each wrapper.

Set one fish filet on each of the lemons, set 2 clams, 2 shrimp, and 2 scallops, and 2 cherry tomatoes around the fish. Top with 2 thyme sprigs.

Shake the wine sauce to combine and pour a quarter over each fish and top with a one piece of the butter.

Crimp each packet and cook in the preheated oven for 15 minutes.

Serve in the package and let each dinner open. The aromatic steam is part of the experience.

Notes

Folding the Parchment Packets

4 half-sheet parchment sheets (16 ½” x 12 ¼”)
Scissors
Large baking tray

Fold the parchment in half and trim to a 15″ x 12″ rectangle. Draw a half heart shape on each and cut with scissors.

Open and lay the ingredients in the center, fold the paper over and crimp.

Crimping the Packet

Start at the top of the packet and fold ½-inch over and crease well. Continue making ½-inch folds with a firm crease until you reach the bottom point. Crimp and tuck final pleat under the packet.

The key to success is a tightly sealed packet to contain the steam.

Aluminum Foil Packets

Use either regular or heavy-duty foil that’s 20 inches wide. Pull 4 sheets that are 20 inches long.

Fold in half, open and place the food in the center of one side. Fold over and square off the side by folding the edge. Turn and fold each end, pressing hard to seal tightly.

The advantages of foil is the ease of creating a secure seal and if you open the packet and the food isn’t cooked through, it reseals easily.

Cilantro Oil

infused oil

I created this Cilantro Oil to use on a Spelt Flatbread with Roasted Spiced Carrot Purée. To make an infused oil, select the type of oil you prefer, such as a mild vegetable oil, extra-virgin olive oil, nut oils, etc. Combine the oil with herbs, spices, garlic, or a any combination. This is a delicious accent for soups, stews, flatbreads, pizza, or a dipping oil for crusty breads. Use an infused oil for a creative twist on a salad dressing or vinaigrette. Drizzle over meat, chicken or fish. Lots of options!

infused oil

This cilantro oil is quick and easy to make. Place the oil, chopped cilantro, and salt in a blender or food processor and purée. Strain for a delicate drizzle of infused oil or leave the pulp in for a stronger flavor.

infused oil

Food Safety Note

Any infused oil that contains raw ingredients has a limited shelf life – 4-5 days tops, and must be refrigerated. The herbs, spices and garlic contain bacteria, commonly anaerobic bacteria, that thrive in oxygen-free environments like an infused oil. Plus a little masking tape on the jar with the date.

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Cilantro Oil

Flavored oils are a great way to enhance a dish. Drizzle over chicken, fish, vegetables or on top of soup. Use sparingly, this cilantro oil packs lots of flavor.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Total Time: 10
  • Yield: 1 cup
  • Category: Condiment
  • Method: Puree

Ingredients

¾ cup olive oil
2 cups roughly chopped cilantro
¼ teaspoon coarse salt

Instructions

Place the oil, cilantro and salt in the base of a food processor or blender and puree thoroughly.

Refrigerate up to 4 days.

Use at room temperature.

Notes

Strain for a refined drizzle. Keep the pulp for a stronger flavor.

 

Lemon Dill Baked Salmon

sustainable fish

My mother and my girlfriend Lynn love salmon. They were talking about recipes at a recent dinner party and they both make a similar version of this Lemon Dill Baked Salmon. Not only is it quick, easy and delicious, but it’s makes a stunning presentation with few ingredients and very little work.

I have become very particular about seafood, questioning the quality and the health of farm-raised seafood, especially in locations where there are no protocols for ensuring that appropriate standards are set and used.

Whole Foods’ seafood department relies on “traceability from farm or fishery to store.” The goal is not only to know the source, but to verify that these sources are responsibly managed, whether it’s a fish farm or fishery. I rely on them for much of my seafood and the seafood is pristine and delicious.

I purchased a beautiful salmon fillet, about 1 1/4 pounds, including the skin, which I removed  (the fish monger will always remove the skin for you, just ask). This produced two thick fillets about 5 ounces each and a smaller, thinner piece, not quite 4 ounces, that I chopped up and made into a salmon burger.

High heat is the best way to cook fish. It’s quick and not much moisture is lost in the process. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Lay the fillets on a lined baking tray, brush with a little olive oil and season with kosher salt and black pepper.

sustainable fishPlace fresh dill fronds across the top.

sustainable fish

Cover each with 2 thin slices of lemon.

sustainable fish

Bake 15 minutes in the preheated oven for medium rare (warm, slightly translucent center) or 20 minutes for a more well done fillet.

sustainable fish

Don’t waste the lemons, give a little squeeze from each slice to brighten the salmon.

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Lemon Dill Baked Salmon

sustainable fish

A quick and easy preparation that is both eye and palate pleasing!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld

Ingredients

4 five-ounce center-cut skinless salmon fillets
olive oil
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
4-5 dill fronds per fillet
1 lemon cut into 8 thin slices

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Lay the fillets on a lined baking tray, brush with oil and season each with 1/8 teaspoon salt and pepper.

Top with dill fronds and 2 lemon slices each.

Bake in preheated oven 15 minutes for medium-rare or 20 minutes for medium-well.

Squeeze the lemons over the fish.

Notes

Be sure to get center-cut fillets, these are the thickest. Tuck the skinny end under (after seasoning) for even cooking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curried Deviled Eggs

Hard-boiled Eggs

Curried deviled eggs are a classic preparation and curry and eggs are a natural pairing. These curried deviled eggs are perfect for a snack, packed in a lunch or as a party appetizer.

An alternative use for deviled eggs is a twist on egg salad. Chop up the egg whites and stir into the egg yolk purée, add a little more mayo if it’s too thick, spread on naan or other bread and enjoy an egg salad sandwich!

See our post on how to cook the perfect hard-boil egg here.

Don’t want to be bothered making hard-boiled eggs? Here are a couple of brands of peeled hard-boiled eggs sold in grocery stores! Look for Eggland’s Best Hard-Boiled Peeled Eggs or Crystal Farms Hard-Boiled Eggs Peeled.

Watch our Curried Deviled Egg Video Here.
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Curried Deviled Eggs

Hard-boiled eggs

Curried deviled eggs are a classic preparation and curry and eggs are a natural pairing. These curried deviled eggs are perfect for a snack, packed in a lunch or as a party appetizer. An alternative use for deviled eggs is a twist on egg salad. Chop up the egg whites and stir into the egg yolk purée, add a little more mayo if it’s too thick, spread on naan or other bread and enjoy an egg salad sandwich!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 30
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 50 minutes
  • Yield: 1 dozen
  • Category: Appetizer

Ingredients

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

2 tablespoons minced shallot (1 small)

1 teaspoon minced clove garlic (1 clove)

½ teaspoon coarse salt

1 tablespoon curry powder (mild or hot)

6 hard-cooked eggs, shelled and sliced in half lengthwise, yolks and whites separated

¼ cup mayonnaise

1 tablespoon lime juice

 

GARNISH

Pinch of lime zest on each egg, optional

Instructions

Melt the butter in a small skillet over medium heat.

 

Stir in shallots, garlic and salt; sweat for 4 minutes or until the shallots are soft.

 

Add the curry powder and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, 30-40 seconds.

 

Place the yolks, mayonnaise and lime juice in the base of a food processor. Purée, scraping sides as needed. Add the cooked shallots and purée again.

 

Fill the cavity of each egg white with the egg yolk purée by using a spoon or a piping bag.

 

Garnish each egg with a pinch of lime zest.

 

Cover and store in the refrigerator for up to 4 days. Best served at room temperature.

 

Zest the lime before juicing!

Notes

Zest the lime before juicing!

Roasted Artichoke Hearts with Lemon Parmesan Vinaigrette

Lemon Parmesan Vinaigrette

Fresh artichokes are delicious but time consuming to prepare. This recipe for roasted artichoke hearts with lemon parmesan vinaigrette works well with frozen artichokes, a quick and easy alternative and thawing is not necessary. Avoid canned or jarred artichokes; they are too soft and don’t hold up well in a cooked recipe.

Lemon Parmesan Vinaigrette

Use as an hors d’oeuvre or first course.

WATCH THE ROASTED ARTICHOKE VIDEO HERE:

 

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Roasted Artichoke Hearts with Lemon Parmesan Vinaigrette

Lemon Parmesan Vinaigrette

Fresh artichokes are delicious, but time consuming to prepare. Frozen artichokes are a quick and easy alternative and thawing is not necessary. Avoid canned or jarred artichokes, which are too soft for additional cooking.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 45
  • Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes
  • Yield: 6 servings
  • Category: Appetizer
  • Method: Roasting

Ingredients

Artichokes

8 baby artichokes or 1 16-ounce bag frozen artichoke hearts, thawed or 1 can (x ounces) canned artichokes, drained
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon coarse salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
lemon-parmesan vinaigrette (recipe follows)

Lemon-Parmesan Vinaigrette

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
¼ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

zest of 1 lemon
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 minced cloves garlic
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
½ teaspoon coarse salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

GARNISH                        

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Instructions

For the Artichokes:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

To use frozen artichokes, lay  on a towel or paper towel and cover with another; press gently to remove excess moisture.

Place the artichokes on a baking sheet and add the olive oil, salt and pepper. Toss to combine.

Bake in preheated oven for 45 minutes, toss halfway through the cooking time. The artichokes are done when the edges are slightly brown and crispy.

Pour the vinaigrette over the artichokes and toss to combine.

Serve on a warm platter or individual plates and garnish with chopped parsley.

For the Vinaigrette: Place the oil, cheese, parsley, lemon zest and juice, garlic, mustard, salt and pepper in a jar and shake to combine.

Notes

Frozen artichokes may several minutes longer than frozen.

Greek-Style Stuffed Peppers

Stuffed Peppers

I was recently confronted with an abundance of multi-colored bell peppers. Peppers are a funny ingredient. Unlike zucchini, another prolific crop, which is easily turned into quick breads and muffins, fritters and casseroles, peppers are rarely the star of the dish.

Think sausage with peppers and onions, fajitas come with sautéed peppers and there are so many recipes that call for peppers to be chopped or diced and added to other aromatics such as onions, garlic, celery and/or carrots as the foundation of a recipe. The only time they stand on their own is as a shell for stuffing. And this is where it gets interesting.

Stuffed Peppers

There are so many different ingredients to choose from. Ground meat of any type is suitable and also optional. There are a multitude of grains and beans to choose from. Add chopped vegetables and herbs and moisten with a sauce and top off with some crumbled or shredded cheese and you have a delicious entrée.

Watch the Greek-Style Stuffed Peppers Video Here.

 

Along with the peppers, I also had a few eggplants and decided to go with a Greek-style stuffed pepper. Start by sautéing some ground lamb and diced onion with salt and pepper. Stir in garlic, oregano and just a bit of cinnamon. To keep it moist, I added a thawed pint of tomato sauce I’d made earlier in the season. Cube the eggplant and toss in couple of cups along with more of those bell peppers cut into small pieces. Let it simmer for about 20 minutes. To finish in a traditional Greek style stir in chopped Kalamata olives and crumbled Feta cheese.

Stuffed Peppers

While the sauce simmers, slice off the tops and remove the core, seeds and membrane and season the insides with a sprinkle of kosher salt and a grind or two of fresh pepper.

I intended to freeze the stuffed peppers in batches for future use and needed to
partially cook the yellow bell peppers that would house the filling. The pre-cooking step deactivates the ripening enzymes to ensure that the peppers retain their color, shape and flavor.

Stuffed Peppers

Place the prepared bell peppers upright in a baking dish. and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Pop in the microwave on high for 3 minutes or until slightly softened. Stuff each shell with the filling.

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Greek-Style Stuffed Peppers

Stuffed Peppers

Use the abundance of vegetables at the farmers’ market to make these delicious and eye-appealing Greek-style stuffed peppers with lamb or to keep it vegan, use a grain such as orzo or quinoa in lieu of the lamb. Keep it colorful and use a variety of colors!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 40 mins
  • Cook Time: 85 mins
  • Total Time: 2 hours 5 mins
  • Yield: 8 servings
  • Category: Main Course
  • Method: Baking

Ingredients

  • 8 bell peppers, tops removed, seeds, ribs and stems removed, save tops
  • kosher salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • Filling
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 pound ground lamb
  • 1 ½ cups minced onion
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano or 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon minced cloves garlic (3 medium cloves)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 cups eggplant, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1 cup chopped bell peppers, any color
  • 1 can (15.5 ounces) fired roasted tomatoes or a pint of tomato sauce
  • ¼ cup chopped Kalamata olives
  • ¼ cup feta cheese crumbles

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Grease a 9- by 13-inch casserole dish
  3. Lined baking sheet to catch any spills
  4. Season the inside of each bell pepper with a sprinkle of kosher salt and a grind or two of fresh pepper. Place upright in a baking dish.
  5. Note: If you are making in advance and planning to freeze, cover tightly with plastic wrap. Pop in the microwave on high for 3 minutes or just until slightly softened.
  6. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in the lamb and onions, using the edge of a wooden spoon to break up the meat into a crumbly mix. Cook until the meat is no longer red.
  7. Stir in the oregano, garlic and cinnamon and cook for 30 seconds.
  8. Add the eggplant, peppers and tomatoes or tomato sauce and bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes.
  9. Stir in the olives and feta off heat and stuff each pepper with the filling.
  10. Cover tightly with foil and place on a lined baking sheet and bake in the preheated oven for 45 minutes, one hour for frozen peppers.

 

Tri-Color Salad with Balsamic Viniagrette

cheese crisps

Complex salads are tossed salads that have more than one ingredient. A great example is the classic Italian Tri-Color Salad, which uses three peppery lettuces: arugula, radicchio and Belgian endive. Pair with a balsamic vinaigrette; the sweetness of the balsamic is a delicious foil for the bitterness of the lettuce.

cheese crisps

Oftentimes this salad is topped with shavings of Parmesan cheese. I thought it would be nice to share a little twist on that — Parmesan crisps!

Use 2 tablespoons grated aged cheese, such as Parmesan or Asiago, per person. Drop onto a lined baking pan and use the back of the spoon to spread into a circle. Finish with a little freshly grated black pepper, if desired. Bake in 400 degree oven for 12 minutes, or until lightly golden. Cool and add to salad or a bread basket.

cheese crisps

Watch the Tri-Color Salad Video here.

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Tri-Color Salad with Balsamic Viniagrette

Here’s a classic Italian salad using arugula, radicchio and endive with a balsamic vinaigrette. Special bonus – cheese crisp recipe included.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 4 portions
  • Category: Salad

Ingredients

Cheese Crisps

½ cup grated Parmesan or Asiago cheese
freshly ground pepper, optional

Balsamic Vinaigrette
1/2 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons good balsamic vinegar
1 smashed clove garlic
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Tri-Color Salad
2 cups arugula
1 cup chopped radicchio
1 cup sliced endive
kosher salt
freshly ground black pepper

Garnish
Shaved aged cheese, such as Asiago or Parmesan or a cheese crisp

 

Instructions

Cheese Crisps

Preheat oven 400 degrees F.

Line a baking sheet with silicon or parchment paper

Drop 2 tablespoonfuls of grated cheese onto the lined baking sheet about 2 inches apart.

Spread the cheese into a circle. Sprinkle with a little freshly ground pepper, optional.

Bake in preheated oven for 12 minutes or until lightly golden.

Balsamic Vinaigrette

Place the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, salt, and pepper in a sealed jar. Let sit, refrigerated, for at lease 30 minutes. Can be made a day in advance.

Remove the garlic before using.

Tri-Color Salad

Place the arugula, radicchio and endive in a salad bowl. Season with a pinch of salt and a couple of turns of the peppermill.

Remove the garlic from the vinaigrette, reseal the jar and shake well. Pour sparingly over the greens and toss.

Garnish with shaved aged cheese, such as Asiago or Parmesan, or cheese crisps.

Notes

Use just enough vinaigrette to coat the lettuce, but not pool at the bottom of the bowl. Save leftover vinaigrette up to 4 days in the refrigerator.

 

Grilled Boneless Chicken Thighs

Grilled Boneless Chicken Thighs

Here’s another video from our mini grilled chicken series featuring grilled boneless chicken thighs.

When the bone is removed from the thigh, the meat is thin and cooking time is quick. Yet, the thighs retain some fat and remain moist. The flavorful meat is good with only salt and pepper and a little oil to prevent sticking. Also try different marinades and rubs.

Grilled Boneless Chicken Thighs

I like to use the grilled boneless chicken thighs in sandwiches. Choose a nice bun or good bread and use your favorite condiment(s), pile on the lettuce and tomatoes and a few slices of dill pickle. The perfect sandwich!

A great sandwich spread is pesto – check out my recipe here.

Tune in to Honeypie’s Recipes YouTube Channel to view the Grilled Chicken Mini Series playlist!

Watch the Grilled Boneless Chicken Thighs Video Here

Quick Marinade Tip

Quick Marinade Trick

This quick marinade tip was a fluke. Many years ago I was making Rosh Hannah dinner. One cousin doesn’t care for red meat and won’t eat the brisket. I always make something else as a second entrée. One year I was running behind and needed something quick. I grilled chicken and as soon as the chicken came in to rest I poured an herbed lemon juice over the chicken.

Quick Marinade TipThe resting time allows the denatured proteins to coagulate again and when they do, they trap this flavorful liquid.

My cousin and her husband loved the dish and she asked for the recipe. When I told her what I did, she didn’t believe me. It was too simple for something that tasted that good!

I sautéed these chicken breasts recently and added a generous splash of wine (rosé was open, red or white is fine – is just a splash) and deglazed the pan. The delicious brown tidbits in the bottom of the pan dissolve with the liquid in seconds. I poured this over the chicken and then the lemon marinade above.

Quick Marinade Tip

You can do this, too. Simply juice a lemon, throw in some thyme sprigs, a smashed clove of garlic and toss these together. Pour this over the chicken after cooking and let rest for 5 minutes. Use lime juice and garlic – sprinkle with chopped cilantro for something different. Combinations are endless.

Watch the Quick Marinade Trick Video Here.