Category: Breakfast & Brunch

Scrambled Eggs With or Without Dairy

Scrambled Eggs with and without dairy

I googled for recipes of scrambled eggs with dairy and without. It was interesting to see how each method has die-hard fans. Does it make a difference if you use dairy nor not?

The water content of the egg white evaporates during cooking. Adding milk, especially whole or 2-percent milk, has added fat and water to keep the eggs moist.

Scrambled Eggs with and without dairy

Lack of dairy produces a scrambled egg that is a little drier and less fluffy, but with more of an eggy taste.

The difference is negligible, though. You decide what’s right for you.

See our post for an in-depth explanation on how to cook protein, which explains why we recommend cooking low and slow.

Scrambled Eggs with and without dairy

Beat the eggs well and season with salt and pepper before cooking for optimum flavor. A non-stick skillet requires less fat than a regular skilled. I prefer butter for the sweet taste it imparts, but you can easily substitute coconut oil or vegetable oil.

Watch the Scrambled Eggs without Dairy video here.

Adding a little milk or cream to your scrambled eggs makes lighter fluffier eggs. A tablespoon or two for 2 or 3 eggs is sufficient, substitute soy, almond or coconut milk, if desired. Final flavor varies.

Watch the Scrambled Eggs with Dairy video here.

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Scrambled Eggs

Scrambled Eggs with and without dairy

Scrambled eggs are delicious for any meal. For lunch place in a pita or wrap with some bacon and sliced tomatoes.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 3 minutes
  • Total Time: 8 minutes
  • Yield: 1 portion
  • Category: Eggs

Ingredients

2 large eggs
1 1/2  tablespoons milk or cream
pinch of salt
pinch of black pepper
2 teaspoons butter or oil

Instructions

Beat the eggs, dairy, salt, and pepper in a medium bowl until frothy.

Heat the butter over medium heat in a skillet.

Once the butter is frothy, pour in the scrambled eggs and gently and continuously stir to create curds.

The eggs are done when all liquid disappears and the eggs are yellow and fluffy.

Notes

Substitute soy, almond or coconut milks for cow’s milk.

 

Grilled Bananas

Grilled Bananas

Grilled peaches, grilled plums, grilled watermelon, grilled pineapple – all pretty common. Grilled bananas??? Why not!

Grilled bananas are delicious and great for breakfast on cereal, granola, pancakes or waffles. They also make a great dessert over ice cream! Check out my ice cream cookbook here!

Grilled Bananas

The key to success is to use underripe bananas. A ripe banana is soft, softens more on the grill and gets mushy. Taste a sliver of the banana. Want it sweeter? Brush with a little honey or agave before grilling.

There is no “recipe” for this. Use as many bananas as you like, brush lightly with a sweetener, if needed. Place on a hot grill and cook a minute, turn and cook a minute, turn and cook a minute, turn and cook a minute. Sprinkle with cinnamon and serve.

Sprinkle immediately with cinnamon to release the essential oils and aroma.

Watch the Grilled Bananas Video Here.

Bacon Spinach Quiche

Quiche

Quiche is simply an omelet in a pre-baked pie shell. It makes for a different presentation than what we usually eat for breakfast and you don’t have to make toast, the crust is a delicious alternative. See our post video on how to blind bake a pie crust.

NOTE: Since taping this video, I now prefer to completely blind bake the crust and not partially as suggested in the video.

Watch the Quiche Video Here:

Quiche is also a wonderful way to use leftovers. Dice up the remains from a charcuterie platter, sharp cheese, salty spicy salami, dice some onions and garlic add in some fresh herbs and you have an improvised quiche. Leftover steamed or roasted vegetables are also great starters for quiche.

Quiche

Use your imagination when you go to the store; look at the fresh produce and select what strikes your fancy and don’t forget some fresh herbs. Pick a cheese, almost any cheese works, that pairs well with your produce or suits your mood that day. The possibilities are endless.

Quiche

Quiche is delicious served hot out of the oven, but it’s also great at room temperature and it travels well. Pack it for lunch for the kids or for yourself at work.

Quiche

Watch the Quiche Video Here
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Bacon Spinach Quiche

quiche

A quiche is simply an omelet in a pastry shell. The possibilities for fillings are endless. Use leftovers or your imagination to create an unending variety!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 1 hour
  • Cook Time: 40 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hour 40 mins
  • Yield: 1 ten-inch pie
  • Category: Eggs
  • Method: Baking

Ingredients

  • One single pie crust
  • 6 large eggs (1 cup)
  • 2 cups half and half
  • 1 teaspoons coarse salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1 ¼ cups diced Gruyere cheese (1/4-inch dice)
  • 1 10-ounce package frozen spinach, squeezed dry
  • ½ cup finely diced cooked bacon, about 5 ounces
  • ½ cup minced shallot

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Place the eggs in a medium mixing bowl and whisk until foamy.
  3. Whisk in the half and half, salt and pepper.
  4. Strew the cheese, spinach, bacon and shallots over the bottom of a half blind-baked pie shell.
  5. Pour the egg mixture over all. And put on a foil line baking tray.
  6. Bake for 30 minutes or until the custard is set.
  7. Let sit for 10 minutes for slicing.

Notes

Line a baking tray with foil or parchment and place the quiche on this for baking. If the quiche leaks, the baking tray contains the mess and keeps your oven clean.

The quiche needs to rest before slicing to allow the eggs to finish gelling.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 8 portions

Cranberry-Orange Scones

Scones

I have a couple of blood oranges on hand and always have dried cranberries in the pantry. Cranberry-Orange Scones coming up!

Scones

We’re in the midst of our first big snow storm for 2017, expecting somewhere between 6- to 12-inches. The plow guys are here now for the first plowing and it looks like we’ve easily hit the 6-inch mark. They’ll be back later in the day, after the snow ends to clean up the rest of the downfall. It’s windy, that howling wind that tells you it’s bitter cold outside – BRRRR. My weather app says the temp is 26, but “real feel” is 4 degrees. Glad I’m inside.

Once these delicious scones come out of the oven, I’ll be sitting by the fireplace with a cup of tea and a warm, aromatic, delicious cranberry-orange scone.

Scones

Stay warm and cozy friends!

Watch the Cranberry-Orange Scone Video Here

 

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Cranberry-Orange Scones

Scones

A delicious start to any morning or with a spot of tea in the afternoon, Cranberry-Orange Scones are always a welcome treat!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 15 mins
  • Cook Time: 12 mins
  • Total Time: 25 mins
  • Yield: 8 scones
  • Category: Baked Good

Ingredients

  • 1 cup white whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup cake flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries
  • grated zest of one orange
  • 1 cup heavy cream

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 450º F (232º C).
  2. Mix flours, baking powder, sugar, and salt in a large mixing bowl.
  3. Slice in butter into 12 pieces and cut into flour until butter is size of peas.
  4. Mix in dried cranberries and orange zest.
  5. Push flour mixture to sides of bowl, making a well in center of bowl. Pour cream into well, and cover with flour mixture. Mix gently, a minimal amount of mixing and kneading produces a light, delicate scone, until all ingredients are wet.
  6. Lightly dust work surface with flour and gently knead dough 10 times. Form dough into a round.
  7. Roll dough to 1/2-inch thickness and slice into 8 wedges.
  8. Place on ungreased cookie sheet and bake in preheated oven for 10 minutes or until lightly browned.
  9. Remove to a cooling rack.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 scone

Rhubarb Coffee Cake

Rhubarb Coffee Cake

This recipe for Rhubarb Coffee Cake brings back a great memory. A few years ago my niece Rebecca, her family and my brother were visiting from Germany. As I was gathering my ingredients for the cake, Rebecca asked if she could help. It was our first cooking experience together.

That visit was a few years ago and Emma, my great-niece, was only 18 months old. She’ll celebrate her 6th birthday next month and has a younger sister, Marla, who’ll celebrate her 4th birthday in January.

Rhubarb Coffee Cake

Unfortunately, we don’t see them very often and with two small children, they don’t come to the US – we go there. We try to visit once a year just to keep up with the girls. That year between visits is a long time at this young age and the changes in the girls are mind blowing.

Rhubarb season here in the northeast is spring. But in the south rhubarb is in season now and occasionally we see it in stores around our area. This cake is sweet-tart and when served warm with a cup of tea or coffee is a nice way to start the day.

Rhubarb Coffee Cake

The cake can be made in advance, frozen, thawed overnight and gently warmed in the oven or microwave. It’s a great recipe to keep on hand for unexpected company, or for breakfast on a holiday morning when you already have a long list of cooking tasks.

Rhubarb Coffee Cake

Watch the Rhubarb Coffee Cake video here.
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Rhubarb Coffee Cake

Rhubarb Coffee Cake

This Rhubarb Coffee Cake is moist, aromatic and delicious. Serve warm or room temperature. Make a batch of strawberry ice cream (see my book Endless Summer) to serve on the side. If using the powdered sugar, sprinkle over the cake just before serving; it dissolves quickly.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Category: Baked Good

Ingredients

  • Streusel Topping
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ½ cup blanched slivered almonds
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon cloves
  • 1/8 teaspoon ginger
  • pinch of nutmeg
  • Cake Batter
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, preferably room temperature
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon ginger
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 2 cups thinly sliced rhubarb
  • powdered sugar for dusting, optional

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Grease a 9-inch angel food or spring-form pan with butter.
  3. Place the butter in an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and beat until smooth, scrapping the sides and beater as needed.
  4. Add the sugar and salt and beat until fluffy, scrapping the sides and beater as needed.
  5. Add the eggs and vanilla and beat on medium high until incorporated, scrape the sides and beater a couple of times until everything is combined. Don’t worry if it looks a little curdled it will smooth out.
  6. Add the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, baking soda, cloves, ginger and nutmeg, mixing on low until the dry ingredients are moist.
  7. Scrape the sides and beater and mix in the sour cream until thoroughly blended and the batter is smooth, scraping sides and beater as needed. Toss in the rhubarb and mix until well incorporated.
  8. Pour the batter into the prepared cake pan. Sprinkle the streusel topping over the cake and bake in preheated oven for 45 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean.
  9. Cool for 10 minutes. Loosen sides before removing the cake to a cooling rack.

Notes

Cake freezes well. Cool completely and wrap tightly.

 

 

Triple Berry Crisp

Fruit Dessert History

Quick and easy Triple Berry Crisp is versatile. Not only is this a wonderful dessert but it also makes an excellent breakfast. The recipe calls for whole-wheat flour, whole oats, brown sugar, almonds, cinnamon, salt and melted butter for the topping and a bounty of fresh fruit – a great way to start the day!

Wash the fruit, drain a little, slide the berries into a deep dish pie pan, cover with the crisp topping and bake for a little over an hour, until the berries are bubbling. No sugar needed in the fruit unless you find it very tart and then I recommend  only a sprinkling of a tablespoon or two over the top of the fruit.

Fruit Dessert History

Make several batches of the topping at once, minus the butter, and keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Use 1 ½ cups of the topping mixed with 6 tablespoons melted butter and combine over 7 cups of fruit.

Fruit Dessert History

Here’s the video, but don’t miss out on the history of the crisp and similar type fruit desserts below!

FOOD HISTORY

Bird’s Nest Pudding, Brown Betty, Buckle, Cobbler, Crisp, Crumble, Grunt, Pandowdy, Slump, Sonker – all names and variations on “old-fashioned” English and Colonial American fruit desserts. If old-fashioned means out of date, I beg to differ. These recipes are wonderful ways to make use of abundant seasonal fresh fruit and are not just for dessert.

The common denominator is the recipes all use fruit, sweeteners, and usually have a crusty top. What varies is the type of fruit, though apples predominate, and the type of pastry that covers the top or on occasion is broken up and mixed into the fruit bottom.

Fruit Dessert History

What’s in a Name

Names are regional and somewhat like barbecue, each style is fiercely defended. The sonker has its own festival in Lowgap, North Carolina and proudly touts the abundance of fruit contained in a sonker compared to a stingy cobbler.

Bird’s nest pudding is made with sliced apples covered with a mixture of milk, eggs, and sugar, and  baked until set, a custard.

Brown betty has layers of fruit, crumbled pastry, fruit, and crumbled pastry. The crumbled pastry absorbs fruit juices and thickens into a pudding-like consistency.

Yellow cake is the base for a buckle with berries strewn across it and topped with crumbs, which is then cut into squares after baking – a precursor to a fruit bar, perhaps.

A cobbler is a deep dish dessert covered with thick biscuit dough, either a solid layer, or cut into rounds, resembling cobbles – hence the name – sprinkled with sugar, and baked until golden brown. The thickness of the biscuit overwhelms the dish and is why Sonker fans claim to have a better fruit to crust ratio.

Grunts and slumps are stovetop versions of a cobbler, which originated in England. The biscuits are steamed in a cast-iron skillet and resemble dumplings. The noise from the bubbling fruit “grunts” as it stews.

To make a pandowdy, the dough is sliced and pressed into the fruit during the last stage of baking. Early recipes referred to this step as dowdying.

Fruit History Dessert

My Favorite

So many to choose from, but for me it’s an easy choice, the crisp, or crumble as the British say, is my favorite. Fruit on the bottom covered with a layer of flour, brown sugar, whole oats and sometimes nuts that is traditionally rubbed with butter. The butter melts in the oven and “crisps” the top. I find, however, that melted butter added to the dry ingredients does a better job. The fat is totally incorporated into the crust and prevents a partially crisp, partially powdery top. Below is my recipe for Triple Berry Crisp.

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Triple Berry Crisp

berry crisp

Not only is this a wonderful dessert but it also makes an excellent breakfast. The recipe calls for whole-wheat flour, whole oats, brown sugar, almonds, cinnamon, salt and melted butter for the topping and a bounty of fresh fruit – a great way to start the day!

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 70 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 40 minutes
  • Yield: 1 nine-inch deep dish crisp
  • Category: Dessert

Ingredients

  • 6-8 cups mixed berries, rinsed and drained
  • 1/3 cup blanched almonds
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar (light or dark)
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup whole oats (not instant)
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 6 tablespoons melted butter

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Slide the berries into a 9-inch deep-dish pie plate.
  3. Place the almonds and sugar in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the blade and finely grind the nuts.
  4. Add the flour, oats, cinnamon, and salt; pulse just enough to combine the ingredients.
  5. Pour the melted butter over the mixture and pulse until well incorporated.
  6. Take handfuls of the crisp topping and cover the fruit. Place in preheated oven and bake for 80 minutes or until the fruit begins to bubble.
  7. Remove and cool.
  8. Serve warm or at room temperature with a dollop of whipped cream or ice cream.

Notes

Use frozen, unsweetened fruit in the off season.

Make up multiple batches of the topping, minus the butter, and keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Use 1 ½ cups of the topping mixed with 6 tablespoons melted butter and combine over 7 cups of fruit. It’s so quick and easy to make these crisps spur of the moment.

 

 

Pumpkin Chocolate Bundt Cake

Pumpkin Chocolate Bundt Cake

Pumpkin and chocolate are delicious together, and whenever you can work a “legitimate” way to sneak some chocolate into your morning all the better! This pumpkin chocolate bundt cake is at the
top of my list for that special morning treat alongside a delicious cup of tea from Goldsmith Teas.

IMG_5208

Canned raw pumpkin is readily available at any grocery store and it’s one-hundred percent pumpkin. No need to go to the fuss of making your own.

The chocolate I prefer is Lindt, my usual go-to brand when baking, which I coarsely chop up. Don’t hesitate to use chocolate chips if that’s what you prefer.

This cake doesn’t need frosting, it’s quite moist and the chocolate gives it that over-the-top quality. A light dusting of powdered sugar, mostly for esthetics, is sufficient. Don’t sprinkle the sugar until just before serving. It dissolves rather quickly.

IMG_5190

The cake freezes well. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and then with freezer paper. Be sure to date and label.

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Pumpkin Chocolate Bundt Cake

Pumpkin Chocolate Bundt Cake

This cake doesn’t need frosting, it’s quite moist and the chocolate gives it that over-the-top quality. A light dusting of powdered sugar, mostly for esthetics, is sufficient. Don’t sprinkle the sugar until just before serving. It dissolves rather quickly. The cake freezes well. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and then with freezer paper. Be sure to date and label.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 30 mins
  • Cook Time: 50 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hour 10 mins
  • Category: Cake
  • Method: Baking

Ingredients

  • 2 cups (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup raw pumpkin
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 8 ounces dark chocolate (70 percent cocoa fat) coarsely chopped or 1 1/2 cups chocolate chips
  • powdered sugar for dusting

Instructions

  1. Setup
  2. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and lightly grease a standard Bundt pan.
  3. Method
  4. In a stand mixer fitted with the beater attachment or with a hand mixer, beat the butter on high until fluffy. Scrape the sides and beater.
  5. Add the sugar and beat on high until combined. Scraping the sides and beater as needed.
  6. Beat in the eggs and vanilla, scraping the sides and beater as needed (don’t worry if it looks curdled, the addition of dry ingredients will resolve that issue).
  7. Mix in the raw pumpkin and sour cream.
  8. Add the four, baking powder, cinnamon, salt, baking soda, ginger and nutmeg to the mixer and beat on low to incorporate the dry ingredients, scrapping the sides as needed, until all the ingredients are moist. Beat on high for 10 seconds.
  9. Stir in the chocolate chunks/chips.
  10. Pour the batter into the prepared Bundt pan and bake in preheated oven for 50 minutes or until a cake tester or toothpick comes out clean when stuck in the center of the cake.
  11. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes and then remove to a cooling rack.

Notes

Cake freezes well.

 

 

Roasted Vegetable and Ham Frittata

What do you do with leftovers? Repurpose them into a Roasted Vegetable and Ham Frittata.

We had leftover roasted vegetables from dinner and leftover ham from the split pea soup I recently made. I tossed the vegetables and ham together and put them in the bottom of a buttered deep-dish pie pan. It took nine well-beaten eggs with to cover this. I didn’t add any salt and pepper to the eggs because the vegetables were well seasoned and the ham salty. It was the right decision, adding any more salt would have been too much.

We had the frittata for dinner with enough leftover for lunch the next day.

Place the vegetables and ham in the bottom of a lightly greased deep-dish pie pan.

IMG_3658

Beat the eggs and dairy until frothy. Pour over the vegetables.

IMG_3661

Bake for one and one-quarter hours or until the frittata is completely set. Test with the blade of a knife. The frittata is done when the knife comes out clean.

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Roasted Vegetable and Ham Frittata

The vegetables I used were well seasoned and I opted not to season the frittata. Be sure to taste your leftovers before seasoning.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 85 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Yield: 6 portions
  • Category: Eggs

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Leftover vegetables
    4 ounces ham, cut into small cubes
    9 large eggs
    1/4 cup milk or half and half
    Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 325ºF.
  2. Place the vegetables and ham in the bottom of a lightly greased deep-dish pie pan.
  3. Beat the eggs and milk until frothy.
  4. Pour over the vegetables.
  5. Bake for one and one-quarter hours or until the frittata is completely set.
  6. Test with the blade of a knife. The frittata is done when the knife comes out clean.
  7. Let sit for 10 minutes to solidify.

 

Marmalade Coffee Cake

I used the Meyer-lemon and blood-orange marmalade I bought yesterday in a sour cream coffee cake. The flavor really came through and the citrus adds a distinct flavor to this rich cake. It’s easy
to make and I like to use a mini Bundt pan, like a muffin tin, but with the Bundt design, or mini loaf pans (5 3/4″ x 6″ x 2 1/2″). They freeze well and you can thaw individually as needed.

Use other low-sugar jams with chunks of fruit, like cherry. Reduce the sugar in the recipe to 3/4 cup if you’re using regular commercial jam.

Method

Preheat oven to 350ºF and lightly grease cake pan.

Beat butter on medium-high, with paddle attachment, until soft and fluffy. Add sugar and cream together. Beat in eggs; either one at a time or both together – if any curdling occurs, the dry ingredients will resolve that.

Add 1 teaspoon vanilla and the first cup of flour. Mix on low, scraping sides. Add second cup and mix on low, scraping sides. Add the last cup with the baking powder, baking soda, and salt; mix on low and scrape sides.

Add the marmalade, scraping sides as needed. Add the sour cream, increase speed to medium, scrape sides as needed.

Once the ingredients are all incorporated, increase speed to medium-high for 20 seconds – the batter will become very smooth.

Scoop batter into cake pan, place in preheated oven, and bake for 40 minutes or until golden brown and inserted toothpick comes out clean.

NOTE: The mini Bundt pan takes about 30 minutes and the mini loaf pan 40 minutes.

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marmalade coffee cake….

Use a mini Bundt pan or mini loaf pans to make small portions. These freeze well. The mini Bundt pan takes about 30 minutes and the mini loaf pan 40 minutes.

  • Author: Trish Lobenfeld
  • Prep Time: 40 minutes
  • Cook Time: 45 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 25 minutes
  • Yield: 1 cake
  • Category: Cake
  • Method: Baking

Ingredients

  • 1 cup unsalted butter
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
  • 1 cup Meyer-lemon and blood-orange marmalade
  • 1 cup sour cream

Instructions

  1. Method
  2. Preheat oven to 350ºF and lightly grease cake pan.
  3. Beat butter on medium-high, with paddle attachment, until soft and fluffy. Add sugar and cream together. Beat in eggs; either one at a time or both together – if any curdling occurs, the dry ingredients will resolve that.
  4. Add 1 teaspoon vanilla and the first cup of flour. Mix on low, scraping sides. Add second cup and mix on low, scraping sides. Add the last cup with the baking powder, baking soda, and salt; mix on low and scrape sides.
  5. Add the marmalade, scraping sides as needed. Add the sour cream, increase speed to medium, scrape sides as needed.
  6. Once the ingredients are all incorporated, increase speed to medium-high for 20 seconds – the batter will become very smooth.
  7. Scoop batter into cake pan, place in preheated oven, and bake for 40 minutes or until golden brown and inserted toothpick comes out clean.

Notes

Reduced fat sour cream is a viable substitute.